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            Full text of "<a href="/details/page6-magazine-70">Page 6 Magazine Issue 70</a>"
          </h1>
          <pre>Support the XL/XE? 
Not me 



Page 6 Publishing's 



• • # 




' &gt; ' I v,/,"ii'ij".J , ■ — f, ■'"•.' ir J — ^'SfJ 



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but you can 

Page 6 supports your Atari with the world's 

oldest and best dedicated magazine ... 
as well as the world*s best PD library „„ 
as well as providing commercial software ... 

Don't be like the guy above 
return the favour 

Keep supporting Page 6 






ATARI 



The Resource for the ATARI CLASSIC and the ATARI ST 



Issue 70 February /March 1995 £2.50 

FOR THE ATARI CLASSIC 

© AUTO FUNCTIONS KEYS 

Add DOS commands at the touch of a key! 

O WRITING A GAME 

All you need to get you started 

O STILL WAITING FOR GO? 

The chequered history of Atari 

VWWIti V A CTtfU UT TMMTMr f Now an even easier way to 
L \hri MSlfill tlUJlINlINuI autorun binary programs 




FOR THE ATARI $T 



MAKING MUSIC 

Will AUDI become obsolete 
or is it possible to adapt to 
future standards? 

PUBLIC DOMAIN neu 











: : ; ; u 


• • • ■ * Iril 




ffl«_ 


* » » * • I * fc— \ 
SVOftt 

[ n 


* § » • • 


* * * 

.LEVEL 


: i_ii 
• **# 




•*•.:•, 33 



PLUS .... TURBO TYPE-INS ... WE TIPSTER ON WE BBUNDLES ... HOOKING UP A VCR 




Tfiarcfcs 



Lea Ellingham puts it all together and fills 
up the gaps but the real thanks goes to the 
following who made this issue possible 

Sandy EtUngham who takes eare of all the 
office work, advertising and mail order 

For their regular contributions 

John 8 Davison Stuart Murray 

Paul Rxxon Nic BaiA ttaton 

Ian Fin lay son Marie Stinson 

Allan J. Palmer The*Tipster 

For their contributions this issue 

Attn O'Drtscolt 
Antony Weir 
Robert de Letter 



Andy Guitlaume 
Les Will iams 
John Young 
Benjamin Arnold 
Chris Thorley 



Andy McAtear 

Peter Kerrison 



______ _____ _________-____ 

Special mentions to 

All those readers who took the trouble of 
sending us Christmas cards with their mes* 
sages of support Much appreciated. 

Some of these folk have supported us from almost 

the beginning and without the in wc would not be 
here. Some are having art if lea published for the first 
time, All are to be thanked for sharing their enthu- 
siasm with all who read New Atari User 



HOW IT'S DONE 

PACE 6 shows Just what you can do with vour Atari- 
NEW ATARI USKK has always been created entirely with 
Atari equipment, Initially on the XL but more lately with 
a Mfga ST and other siuff, who needs 1*0 or M^vsi 
Hardware includes, a Mega ST2 (upgraded to 4Mb), 
SM 1 25 Monitor. Supra 30Mb Hard Disk, a [IP Laserjet 
III. Ciuzcn 12413 printer, Philips CM6833 monitor. 
130XE, a couple of 1050 disk drives, 850 interface, NEC 
8023 printer, Principal software used ts Pretext and 
Fleet Street Publisher 3.0 Other software Includes Ker- 
mlt, TarlTa Ik. Turbo Ba*kc and various custom written 
programs on the Xi./XE. Articles submitted on XLfXE 
disks ant transferred across to the ST Via TARTTALK. 
Programs are coded on the XE and printed out directs 
Tor pasting in after the typesetting la completed. All 
major editing Is done wtih Protest and pages are laid out 
widh Fleet Street Publisher, Each page is output directly 
from Fleet Street tn a HP Laserjet lir'whkh produces 
finished pages exactly as you see them All that Is left Is 
to drop In the listings and photos. 

Well, it's not quite as easy as that but you get the ideal 



Inspiration 






PAGE 6 PUBLISHING'* 




Editorial address; P.O. Box 54, Stafford, ST1&amp; 1DR, ENGLAND Tel. 01785 213928 
Editor it Publisher: Les Ellingham - Advertising: Sandy Ellingham 
Page layoui by PAGE 6 - Printed by Dolphin Press, Fife, Scotland 0592 771652 
HEW ATARI USER Is published bi-monthly on the last Thursday ot the month prior to cover date 

Page 6's New Atari User 




One of the great pyx of mus tail insjrtnuion tx di* 
artists Or new works almost by acrtrUiu Tina ha™"** 1 " 9 * MUf 
recently u*h Mike Ofdftetd wfose latest' mark l^TtT^! 
Distant Earth a tltte that I t'wnedmtely «™ynl*ed al 9 * ° j 
Arthur C Clarice'.; novels. Being a tocaJ devote* ™J cSt^S, 
□rArtWC. Clarke 1 had to hoi* the CD ushqteLrr the n, 
might be tike. As tt turns autttts excellent, very atmospheric- 
and capturing the frue^t'Jfcig oftraue 1 ami life In worlds 
beyond the EanK tH have to re read the book newt Airmna 
the Christmas presents uhs TVari^niiUng Lbx from Hureia 
which, although then? ts nothing new. Is as brtillam as anij- 
thmg tfwy have done. Retnfvrcetl by an appearance on in* TV 
on New Year's Hue theg have to he c4u# to bring the best 
bond around. That Hogmanay pragrom itself was, an insptra 
Han Wtth Mary and Frances Black. Ahf Bain. Nonet Gf-tflltft 
and Kiiririo all together. Whoever managed to get that together 
far arte of the most popular broadcasting s,\atx of the Wear 
deserves to be put in charge of an entire TV channel. That 
would realty be worth watching! Final inspiration Sits liiue 
Nell Young, utfho again was on tiw TV briefhj over New Year, 
tilth Sleeps Wtth Ar\£eis which I discovered at a rtdtcukms 
price in Woohuorihs among the half price onset and baubles. 
Not JOCftb Inspiring but u."tth sane very good songs spoilt only 
by one trade aptly called Piece afCrapt 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

Without cart tri burtons from its render*, NEW 
ATARI USfM would not be possible. PAGE 6 wel- 
comes and encourages Its readers to subml t, 
articles, prayrxims and reviews for publication. 
Programs must be submitted on disk or cassette. 
articles should wherever possible be submitted 
as textfiies on disk. We seek to encourage your 
participation and da not have strict rules for 
submissions. If something Interests you, writ* a 
program or article and iubmir It.' 

COPYRIGHT 

All firttflrtal articles, programs and other material in 
NEW ATARI USER remain the copyright of the au- 
thor as credited. All uncrcdited material Is copyright 
PACE 6. Permission must be souobi by anyone 
wishing to republish any material Whilst we take 
whatever steps we can to ensure the accuracy o\ 
articles and programs and the contents of advert" 
merits. PAGE 6 cannot be held liable for any errors 
or claims made hy advertisers. 

ATARI &lt;TM) i. ■ regmered trtdenwrk ffl ATARI CORP. All 
wfcrencei .N&gt;uJdl» ,d noted NEW ATAH1 USSR t* "J 
kKkptnoent puWieabon and has no connection *Hn *«" ^ 
with any otitr company or pubtiilw. 



Lr^liswo 

A JARi CONTENTS 



*The Magazine for the 
Dedicated Atari Uaer* 

ISSN No. OT5a'770S 

REGULARS 



EDITORIAL 


4 


MAILBAG 


6 


THE TIPSTER 


10 


DISK BONUS 


17 



AN ADVENTURE DOUBLE 
CLASSIC PD ZONE 24 

SOFTWARE CLASSICS 30 
TUTORIAL TIME 48 

ACCESSORY SHOP 51 
CONTACT IBC 

ST CORNER 

MAKING MUSIC 56 

Futurepfoofing the 
MIDI standard 
ST PD ROUNDUP 60 

ADVERTISERS 

MICRO DISCOUNT 12 
NOSAUG/FUTURA 27 
DEAN GARRAGHTY 42 



Issue 70 - February /March 1995 



PROGRAMS 

TICK-TOCK! 

A type- in Turbo clock 

THE CAVES OF CTULHI 

Fltn and adventure, platform style 

MINI TURBOS 2 

Four quick to type mini programs 

AUTO FUNCTION KEYS 
EVEN EASIER RUNNING! 

FEATURES 

WRITING A GAME 

STILL WAITING FOR GO? 

SIGHT AND SOUND 

How to hook up a VCR 
X-STATIC 

Tackling the problems of static 



5 
18 

28 

32 

39 



13 
20 
40 

44 



REVIEWS 



ARENA 
STATIONFALL 
GTRACKER 
NOSAUG TAPES 



35 
36 
43 
46 



The next issue p/JVEW ATARI USER Ls due to be published on 31** March 
Editorial copy date Is 27th February 



MAGAZINE ONLY 

Annual subscription rates (6 issues) 

UK £15.00 

Europe (Air Mail} El 7.00 

Elsewhere (Surface) £ 1 7.00 

Elsewhere (Air Mail) £23.00 

Overseas faies reflect only the difference in 
postal costs 



DISK SUBSCRIPTION 

A disk containing all oi th* s-bit prog rem 3 from ee*h 
issue of NEW ATARI USER is available either aeparati 
ly or on subset ipi ion. Single price E2.95 per disk, a 
dish subscription saves you almost C&amp; a year, Sub. 
script ion rate 9 ffi issues) 



UK 
Europe 

Else* ha re (sea) 
Elsewhere (Air) 



C25.00 
£32.00 
£32.00 
£42 00 



Please make: cheques payable to PAGE 6 PUBLISHING and send to 
PAGE 6 Publishing, P.O. Box 54, Stafford, ST16 1DR 



T,(titorial 



The reaction to the change in size was not quite what ] expected. 1 had 
expected one or two dissenting remarks yet, almost without exception, the 
commenLs where veiy positive with one reader wrlling tq say that Issue 69 
was the best ever! The single correspondent who made any form of criticism suggested 
that the price should now be reduced but that fails to take into account the cost of 
producing a quality magazine and the costs incurred over the past couple of years of 
keeping the format in its previous incarnation for as long as we could. 

So most people seem happy with the new style of New Atari User (the debate about 
whether to call it Page 6 again^has not been setded!) and It is now up to us - and you - to 
ensure that we can continue with a quality magazine for several more years. What we 
need now is a continuing supply of good quality articles and programs for us to feature 
and for you to share with your fellow enthusiasts. As 1 have said on many occasions 
before we need your contributions to keep up the interest in the magazine. 

In some areas we are quite short of articles and programs. What we especially 
need are programs that are well documented. We have a vast number of 
programs received over the years which are good enough to be included in 
the magazine but which have no accompanying documentation. It is almost impossible 
to lake someone else's programs and write about diem, only the author knows how they 
came to be. The important thing Is to write down all the information you can about any 
program that you submit. I have said many times before, and repeat It again, that you do 
not need to be a professional writer so don't worry If you can't write flowing prose. Just 
put down all the detail and if it needs knocking into shape then I'll do that when it is 
published. 

We particularly need longer or more complicated programs that we can use for Disk 
Bonuses as these are now in very short supply. We also need shortish programs with 
covering articles to include in the magazine, These can be anything you want, from a 
routine to Include in other programs, to useful utilities, fun demos or simple games. If 
you And It interesting and enjoyable, chancres are others will too. if you can't come up 
with something to contribute, drop us a line and tell us what you would like to see 
published and we can then run a column with your "wants' which, hopefully, will spur 
others to come up with the articles and programs. 

One of the most strange things to have happened in the past three or four 
months is that many of you have stopped writing. Since Just before Christ- 
mas we have received fewer letters for Mailbag, fewer Tipsier hints and fewer 
Contact notices than ever before. What's happening? Have all the regular correspondents 
run out oT things to write? Have you all been too busy? Whatever the reason please get 
your pens or word processors out. again and write to us. Mailbag is an important part of 
the magazine that can keep people interested and spur them on to new things so let's 
have your reaction to letters published and new subjects raised for others to react to, 

The drop in the Contact column has bee quite amazing but since many of the past 
notices were from people selling their fl-bit systems I am not really bothered. The more 
people who hang on to their Atari Classics the better! Perhaps the drop coincided with 
the decision to charge for the service, but that has now been reversed and the column is 
free to subscribers. Use it to get in touch with your fellow enthusiasts. 

That's all - now let's hear from you with all those great pnigrams and articles which 1 
know are out there just waiting to be shared with others 

Les 'Ellmfiham 

* Page 6's New Atari User 



TURBO 



Save the expense of buying a 
clock for your computer 
room, just turn your Classic 
Into a neat timepiece! Although this 
is just a straightforward simulation 
of an analogue clock which has little 
direct use, the routines may well 
prove useful for timing routines 
within your programs. 
Onee the program Is up and run- 
ning, you Just type in the start time 
in twelve hour format and, after the 
screen has been setup. Just press 
any key to start the clock ticking. 
The program waits until the correct 
amount of jiflles at location 20 
[KTCLOKbyte 3) have passed, then 
updates the second' hand which in 
turn updates the 'minute' and hour' 
hands. An array of Sin and Cos 
values is used for extra speed. 
The time of one "program second'' is 
sei at SPEED on line 20, This is the 
amount of jiffies in be counted be- 
fore the 'second" hand is to be up- 
dated, and is set to 50 for a stan- 
dard U.K. XL, Those in the USA. 
(."ic. will have to lower or raise this 
value to suit- Notice that seconds 
and minutes are increased in steps 
of 6, this is because they are angles 
not real values and are calculated 
from the entered time. (i.e. 360 
degrees /60 seconds or minutes = 6) 
The hour' hand is moved at the 
same time as the 'minute' hand so 
that it moves during the hour, if this 
was not so the "hour" hand would 
skip from hour to hour giving a 
rather Jerky movement. 

by 
Andy Guillaume 



TICK-TOCK! 



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REM O HEM ATARI USER - FED 1995 



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C3*30) ;SY=CY- EC5E5ECJWJ8J 
UP 128 COLOR Kl:PL0T CK,CY!DRAUTQ iH/iViK 

LOT CK,CV;DRAHTO HHK, HHY : PLOT CX,CY:DR 

AHTO HHK, HHY 
01 130 IF SEC&lt;3&amp;0 THEN 100 
PA 140 5EC=XR:CQLDR XOiPLOT CM , C Y : DRAHT 

HHK , HHY : MTN = HTN + 6 ; HHM = CH+ C5N 1MIH3 *78) : 

HHY=CY- CCS(MJIN)*?8) 
BG 150 COLOR Ki:PLQT CK,CY;DRAMT0 HHK, HHY 

:hOUli -H1JUR+HMF: IF HOtlflO INT (HOUR) THEM 
170 
LI 160 COLOR X0:PLQT CX, CY ; &amp;RAHTO HHK, HHY 

! IIHH (VH* E'.H (HOUR) «5B) i HHY~CY fCS EHOUR) 

*S0J 
HI 17© COLOR XI : PLOT CM ( CY:DRAHTQ HHK, HHY 
BT 188 POKE 77,&gt;18:IF MXN&gt;360 THEN MIH = HIH 

-380 
IE 190 IF HOUR) 368 THEN HOUR =HCUR - Jbl! 
Ill 200 Ml TO 100 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Mailbag 





Welcome to 1 9951 Hope 
you've all aajwsted to 
the new format NEW 
ATARI USER. Let's have 
some letters about this 
please 1 As it stands 
(perhaps due to Xmas 
and New Year celebra- 
tions) we haven't re- 
ceived much in the way 
of contributions for 
MAILBAG this time, so 
this looks as though it's 
going to be my shortest 
column- Please make it 
your New Year's resolu- 
tion to write more let- 
ters - if you don't write, 
how can we judge if the 
Classic Atari is still 
holding your interest? 

So let's boldly go where 
no letter column has 
gone before and dig in 
to this month's postal 
missives ... 

Allan J. Palmer 



MAGAZINE 
FORMAT 

Editor's note: We actually re- 
ceived many letters on the 
subject of the future format of 
the magazine than appear 
here, and thanks to everyone 
who wrote, but these were 
not passed on toAUan as 
many of the comments men? 
similar and i did not think a 
whale Mailbag of neaHy iden- 
tical letters would be very in- 
teresting! We have had a 
good number of comments 
since Issue 69 went out, 
mostly on the telephone, and 
all bar one have been most 
Jauourable, Cheek the edito- 
rial this issue for more detaH 
Back to Allan ,,, 

Brad Rogers from South- 
ampton sent these Lhoughts 
before the new format 
appeared: "Obviously the 
magazine will remain as a 
subscription only publica- 
tion. If printing the magazine 
in A5 format is cost effective, 
then so be fl- However. I 
would prefer to sec listings 
left in the magazine (despite 
being a disk subscriber), so 
my preference would be for 
A4 format, but cheaper 
paper. Newsprint would be 
too nasty to contemplate 
though! I would like to see 
the order form kept separate 
from the magazine, since I 
loathe cutting magazines- 
Yes, 1 know about photo- 
copiers, but not everybody 
has free access to one. If the 
Page 6's New Atari User 



order form were just a blank 
pro -forma, rather than a uni- 
que one, then there would be 
no need to print new forms 
for every issue. This implies 
that I have no objection to 
putting the list of new PD 
disks in the magazine. The 
name? My preference is for 
'PAGE 6". since that's how I 
still refer to the magazine, ST 
coverage? If the past is any- 
thing to go by, it seems to me 
that Page 6/NAU will be the 
only mag providing coverage." 

Also before getting issue 6*9, 
franJcAtJrtn/rom Cosport 
Ikmts wrote:". ,,re the A4/A5 
format, it is the contents that 
matter, and if It to all our 
benefit go to A5. if not then 
keep to A4, TWAUG has an 
A5 format ... good value for 
money and like NAU is very 
much looked forward to." 

T Thanks for your thoughts 
Brad and Frank: what did 
you think of issue 69? 



AU TOOLKIT 

Brian Arnold of Worthing Sus 
sex has a plea for help: 
' [ las anyone managed to 
transfer to disk the old Atari 
User TOOLKIT tape'? I have 
had no success at all. even 
by using TRANSDISK [V. I 
end up with a screen full of 
garbage, and get the same re- 
sult if I try direct loading of 

the tape." 
T ! am sure the Atari User 

Toolkit was available on di$* 
so it should work. 



POWER PACKS THUNDER ISLAND 



From Southampton, Brad Ro- 
gers provides [in response to 
enquiries in issue 68) this irt- 
fow^alion about power packs 
used by Atad S-bits: 
This list is by no means ex- 
haustive, but for what it's 
worth, here goes 

Description VoiUge Current AC- DC 

130XE Computer 5V 2. 5 A DC 

410 Tape Deck 6V 1.6 A DC 

800 Computer 9 5V 1 5A DC 

350 Interlace 9V 3 A AC 

1050 Disk Drive 9V 3 A AC 

XEPBO Display 9V 5A DC 

C&lt;i'd 

XF551 Disk Drive 9V 3A AC 

So, M. Tomhn is using a suit- 
able PSU for his disk drive. It 
should be stated that the 
above are minimum require- 
ments, and meatier PSU's 
can't do any harm. Further, 
it may be inferred from the 
above list that all Atari 8-bit 
disk drives use the same 
power unit. If this should 
prove not to be the case, 
don't blame me!" 
T Thanks for the information 
Brad: can anyone provide 
further update to this table? 



8-BIT VIRUSES? 

Self-styled W.A.CO., M. Torn- 
Itn of Basildon in Essex: 
"■ ■ was wondering if any Atari 
classic user has had trouble 
with a computer virus? I 
Would like to ask the readers 
°ut there for input on this 



Brian Arnold of Worthing, West Sussex feels "Thunder island" 
in issue 68 was "...a very good type-In, but t found it some- 
thing of a nuisance to have to keep the article handy in order 
to refer to the Game Options table with Its many levels. I 
therefore thought it would be a good idea to have this table on 
the title screen, for case uf reference. I renamed LANTERN as 
LAMP, and with a good deal of abbreviation managed (« get it 
all In. Lines 340-370 should be re-typed as shown below. No 
other changes are needed I hope others will find this useful. 



PLAYER:LEVE* 



3«POS.C10,C4:?"ONE] 

351 POS. C4,C6:? ' fli^M? FOR FLYERS^ Q FOR LEVEL" 

352 POS. C4,C8:? ' Tiag-VJtfmgntffn ¥M'lWXi J:B:TT&gt;TTTi " 

353 POS. C4,C9:? "LAMP ESYmedHRD LMP1 LMP2 ESYmedHRD" 

354 POS. C4,ClO:?"Lge 1 2 3 Lge Lge 1 2 3" 

355 POS. C4,C11:? "Med 4 S 6 Lge Med 10 1112" 

356 POS. C4,C12:?"Stfnl 7 B 9 Lg&lt; Sml 13 14 15" 



357POS. C4,C13:?' 
35« POS. C4,C14:?" 
358 POS, C4 T C15:?' 

360 POS. C4 T C16:7" 

361 POS. C4,17:? " 



1 PLAYERiDA 



PLAYER:0A 



Med Lge 19 20 21" 
12 Med Med 4 5 6" 

Med Sml 16 17 18" 
2B 29 30 Sml Lge 22 23 24" 
Sml Med 25 26 2T 
7 S 9" 



362 POS, C3,16:7 "^EB T0 PLAYJSml Sml 

365 SKILL=C1:LEVELP=C1 

370 POS. 27,04:7 SKILL; :FOR X=Cl TO 100:NEXT X 

Editor's note'. You wiR have to experiment with tl\e spaces to 
get the table correct Using a typeface like this means that the 
characters liave proportional widths so do not match exactly 
with what will appear on screen. 



one as I have never seen any 
8-bitter say they have." 
f Pmnot awfireofany 
viruses existing on 8-bit 
machines, but I have the 
vague feeling of somebody 
writing on this subject in the 
dim and distant past. Can 
anyone comment on the sub- 
ject? (The Compute! )xx&gt;k 
Page 6's New Atari User 



Computer Viruses had a 
whole section on the Atari 
3-bit but the viruses did not 
appear to be as serious as on 
other computers, IM/brtunoie- 
ly the book is now out of 
print I have newer come 
across any vims similar to 
tiiose common on the ST but 
they do, apparently, exist! Bd-i 

7 





MONITOR 
FOR AN XL? 

Peter Foote of Yeovd, Some- 
rset would like to thank ". , .all 
those who contribute to New 
Atiiri User. The articles ptu 
vide a vaJuabk service to * 
those of us who are still In. 
the dark,'' Thanks Peter, it's 
gratifying to know that people 
do appreciate other people's 
efforts. Peter goes on to report 
that his colour TV used wUh 
his Classic Atari is now de- 
funct and ts "...contemplating 
the purchase of a monitor. 
What type of monitor can be 
connected to the XL compu- 
ter? Can you suggest any 
models and where they can 
be acquired from?" 
1 Right, let's here it from the 
assembled masses - what 
-sorts of monitors are used out 
there? (Don'tfonjet ffeter 
you'U. need to make a cable 
that provides the appropriate 
connections - something I'm 
sure we've covered in pre- 
vious issues of the magazine) . 



EXPANDING 

THE ATARI 

Peter Foote of Yeovil also asks 
"...back In Issue of 32 of NAU. 
a column called Expanding 
Your Atari' was started by 
Mark Fowler. Was the series 
ever completed or was It held 
over?" 
1 I think Peter, that no furth- 



er articles were forthcoming, 
and there was concern about 
the safety aspects of connect- 
ing an Atari to other electrical 
equipment Perhaps our 
esteemed Publisher can add a 
few words... /The major prob- 
lem was that there were a 
number of errors in the cuti- 
cles which one or two readers 
brought to my attention. As I 
have never been a hardware 
buff, there was no way of 
checking u'hefher the remain- 
ing articles were accurate so I 
decided to give the series tiw 
clvop. Better that than have 
someone blow up their be- 
loved Atari'! 



DISK BOXES 

In reply to queries in previous 
issues about the avail ability 
of 5 ¥$" disk boxes, Kevin Cooke 
from Exeter, Deiwn reports 
that he has found a good 
source in Dean Ganaghty - 
you should find a DGS advert 
in any recent issue of NAU 
with contact details. 



VIDEO 
CONNECTIONS 

In the last Issue, I asked if 
anuone had Ideas about 
using a Classic Atari connec- 
ted to a video recorder, Kevin 
Crake (of Exeter Devon, 
ogam) responded as follows: 
"\ do not own the Video Title 
Shop program at present but 
hopefully Til get the chance 
Page 6's New Atari User 



to try it out tn the future. 
However, the video link can 
also come tn handy when 
playing games and tiying to 
write the solution for the 
Tipster. By playing the ^^ 
ihrough (while recording it] 
and then watching it from the 
video at your own pace, you 
can sec exactly what moves 
you made P making it easier to 
draw maps and write solu- 
tions. I was also intending to 
use the link to create an 
advertisement as part of my 
GCSE coureework in my 
Media Studies lesson at 
school but. unfortunately, [ 
didn't get around to making 
the cable until after the 
hand -in date. 1 may still use 
the link for my final project 
though and. if I do. I'll try to 
send you a copy of it." 
Thanks for the comments, 
Kevin, and good luck with 
your project. 



LIGHT GUN 
GAMES 

Following Jason Kendall's en- 
quiry about light gun games 
for the Classic Atari, Kevin 
Cooke (still of Exeter, Devon) 
sends these notes: 
Jason should perhaps take a 
look at Patrice Robert's arti- 
cle in NAU issue 54 detailing 
CROSS HOW, BARNYARD 
BLASTER. CRIME BUSTER 
LIGHT GUN BLASTER J"* 1 
GANGSTER VI LLE. I also 
own ALIEN BIAST. a Space 
Invaders clone that works 



with ihe light gun. ALIEN 
BLAST is available from Dean 
Garraghty. BARNYARD 
BLASTER, CROSSBOW and 
CRIME BUSTER may still be 
available from Derek Fern's 
Micro Discount, and LIGHT 
GUN BLASTER is available 
on Page 6's PD Library disk 
Pe drokko 4, The only game I 
have yet to track down is 
GANGSTER VI LLE - does 
anyone know where it is 
available from?" 
t Once again, Kevin, thanks 
for your input/ 

Well I'm afraid thai s it - 
that's ALL the maii receiued 
in lime for this issue (arid 
even now I'm running past 
Les' original deadline - so you 
might not actually see this in 
issue 70 - and if you don't 
you. can't actually be reading 
this can you? Hmmmm... ts 
this the first case of a Classic 
A tan' time paradox? Send for 
Agents Milder and Scully 
from the X-Files? Nah, know- 
•jio our it«-k ivc'd ptobabh) 
end up with Mr. Jilobby and 
Danny Baker,'.'.' 

Don't forget to write... 



FOR THE FUTURE? 



What would you like to see in future issi es of New 
Atari User? Are there specific tutorials you mould 
like to see? Is there a program that you have never 
s-rerc before on the Atari or one which might help 
you with a particular task? Perhaps you are stuck 
on a section of a program that you have been 
writing for years, tf that's the case someone read- 
ing New Atari User could help you. 

One idea we have had for a while is a sort of 
programmer's clinic or 'How do they do that?' in 
which readers could write in. with questions for 
simple programming routines and others could 
provide the answers. For example how to you write 
a timing routine that continues counting as you 
input text from the keyboard? How can you disable 
ail keys except Y and N? How do people move the 
directory on a disk so that it can't be read with 
DOS? 

There are hundreds more questions like these and 
we could run them as an extension ofMailbag by 
publishing a selection of programming questions, 
followed the next issue by, hopefully, some of the 
answers. Whatever the question. Someone, some- 
where knouts the answer. 

That's one idea for a future column but there 
must be many more so write in and tell us so we 
can give you what you want- The address is below. 



Air your views on all things Atari or help your 
fellow users with their queries - even ask for 
help yourself. It's all interesting, if only you 
write it down. Here's the address; 

MAILBAG 

NEW ATARI USER 

P.O. BOX 54, STAFFORD 

ST16 1TB 

Page 6's New Atari User 




Ain't it better to write to NAifS 

9 




The TIPSTER qk '$MM0Wffl)m 



/^ ^ our regular Tipster was last seen 
* Y buried beneath a mound of Christmas 
_j/ pudding faced with sherry, brandy, 
rum and other liquids that help to keep Christ- 
mas merry. By the tune he emerges he'll be 
trying to get that Falcon of his to perch on his 
WFtstt lAickikj we can turn this issue's column 
auer to a guest Tipster - Mr, Les Will tarns - who 
provided enough feedback on Issue 68' s tips 
toflE the column. Your regular Tipster will be 
back next time - provided of course that you 
keep those hints and tips coming • but mean- 
while its goodbye to him and hello, and 
thanks, to Les. 



Start here 



■ » » 



Coloured tile system. 

The ET system colour coding , and how to use the 
system, is a stinker! 

The colour coding is based on the resistor colour 
code {if the player is not familiar with this code I 
don't know how it could be interpreted) 
The tile coding is therefore- 



BLACKED 


BROWNE 


RED=2 


ORANGE=3 


YELLOWS 


GREEN-5 


BLUE=6 


VIOLETS 


GREY-8 


WHITE=9 







R 



ight, let's go! Check out Issue 68 of 
New Atari User and we'll tie up a lot of 
loose ends. 



When you go into the ET system it will be seen that 
there are 7 colour codes The first colour shows you 
which system you are in &lt; there are systems around 
the ET Roundabout) e.g. system (Black) is he 
southerly one. system 3 (Orange) is the easterly 



m 



THEBRUNDLES OOOOO 

On my disk there is no problem, with Level 61 i.e. It scrolls to the left to reveal the home. I agree 
with Peter's comments about Level 60 -if you Nuke 'em the lock-up is even more spectacular 
than exploding just one Brundle! As a follow-up here are most of the other codes. 



61 


HALLE 


71 


FOHCE 


81 


BOHEM 


91 


QPONG 


62 


MUSIC 


72 


SUDAN 


82 


ETHIC 


92 


FLOOR 


63 


RADIO 


73 


CRUEL 


83 


SAMBA 


93 


BORIN 


64 


PSYCH 


74 


SONIQ 


84 


ORDER 


94 


INTER 


65 


SOUND 


7S 


TUTOR 


85 


CENTS 


95 


PRIDE 


66 


CODEX 


76 


STYLE 


86 


POUND 


96 


BLACK 


67 


HEART 


77 


ELTON 


87 


OCEAN 


97 


EPROM 


68 


CHILD 


76 


RESET 


83 


TEKNO 


98 


MICRO 


69 


WALLS 


79 


BOARD 


89 


DJDAG 


99 


? 


70 


JOYCE 


eo 


FRESH 


90 


SPOON 


100 


? 



Level 98 Is Impossible with the 60s time limit! Even if ihc - key Is depressed immediately the 
START key is depressed, and held down until the fall rate Is 99. the last drop takes 35s. Since 
it then takes 35s for the Brundle to walk from the drop-zone to home, a minimum time limit fl 



70s is required i.e. 7 5s -80s is more realistic 

Any known fix with a disk editor? - 

10 



Once you have verified that you are in Che re- 
quired system, the first colour can be ignored. 
When you arrive at the walkaway of the required 
system, go N 1 2 times to get to the ET hub (there 
is a quicker way. hut I will leave it for you to find!) 
In each system there are 1 ,000,000 locations, i.e. 
4,000,000 in all of which only 6 have to be visited! 
I have found that the only locations you need to 
use are the Easterly ones shown in the table 
below, the numbers being the resultant decoded 
colours, 



ET Hub 


0* 


531441 


Ignore 


Inner Ring 





177147 


354294 


Inner Ring 





59049 


118098 


Ring 





19683 


39366 


Ring 





6561 


13122 


Central Ring 





2187 


4374 


Central Ring 





729 


1456 


Central Ring 





243 


486 


Ring 





81 


163 


Ring 





27 


54 


Outer Rin=g 





9 


18 


Outer Ring 





3 


6 


Walkaway 





1 


2 




V 


Start point 





Note si- 
ft) To gel to 13122 go S.S.S.S.E.E 

(2) To get to 2187 go S.S.S.S.S.E 

(3) The sum of the locations visited must equal 
the required address eg, 

S3 SS E E S.E S.S.S .S .S.S.S will get you to 
th a door of address 15309 i.e. 13122+2187 
(4) For directions S.E, you can use SE, 

RETURN TO EDEN 

Take the LOG to the island, 
leave the DRY BULB on the 
ground and SQUEEZE LOG. 



4. wotked example. 

Assume the address you require has been given 
the colour code BROWN GREY SLACK GREY 
BROWN BLUE RED 

Decoding gives 1808162 i.e. the address is 
808162 in system 1 Go to the ET hub and work 
out the required directions as follows:- 



SE 



SE. 



SE E 



S.S.SE. 



808162 
531441 

276721 
■177147 



99574 
-59049 

40525 
■39366 

1159 
729 



430 



SE 



SEE, 



SSE.E. 



SEE, 



SE, 



430 
-243 

187 
162 

25 
■18 



7 
6 

t 

-1 



Now go S, and you will then enter the required 
address ■ I hope 1 

WARNING - If you start the adventure anew all 
the addresses will have been changed! 

Curfew 

The only purpose I can remember for the curfew 
is to swell the coffers of the local Fuzbots and to 
make the player bankrupt If this happens you 
are slung in jail and the key is then thrown away' 
If you spend your first night at your home in bed 
when the curfew begins you earn 40 points. It is 
also to your advantage lo watch (he TV - many 
useful commercials are broadcast. (SAY HOME 
on any road arid you get a tree ride home!} . 
Note your colour coded address and. by using 
the earlier explanation of the ET system, see if 
you can lind your own way home trorn the ET 
hub. I hope you looked in the criminal's wallet 
before handing it in! 

*End Here 

but turn the page for more B ^ 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page 6's New Ataii User 



11 



MICRO DISCOUNT 

265 Chester Road, Streetly, West Midlands. B74 3EA. England 
Tel: 021-353-5730 or FAX; 021-352-1669 



DISK SOFTWARE 



ARTEFACT E 9.95 

BANG SANK C 5.95 

BATTLESHIPS £4.50 

HUMANOID £ 5.95 

INSIDE £5.95 

IMAGINE £6.95 

DALLAS QUEST £ 9.95 

OAflKNESS HOUR £ 5.95 

DARK ABYSS £5.95 

MIECZE VALDGIRA I £7.95 

MIDNIGHT £ 6.95 

MICAOX £ 6.95 

OBUTIIOB £ 6.95 



S£XVERSI £5.95 

SOUND TRACKER £5.95 
SPECIAL FORCES £ 6.95 
TAGALON £ 5.95 

TECHNO NINJA £ 5 95 
THE LAST 

GUARDIAN £ 5.95 

THE BRUNDLES £15.00 
BRU MOLES EDITOR £ 7.50 
THE CURSE E 6 99 

DROP IT |3DTETRIS}E 5.95 
VICKY £ 5.95 

MEGAMAG7i'2disks'i£4.0O 



You can now nm Atari Skit sofbmre on your K3 
PC XFORMER only £2 1.00 

HOW AVAILABLE! 
MENU PRINT £6.95 

The new disK cataloguing system from Davd Dawes 



NEZW 



ATARI 1020 4 COLOUR PRINTER PLOTTERS 
ATARI UGHT PEN &amp; CARTRIDGE SOFTWARE 
WIZZTROHCS 256* BTOXL UPGRADE (PART KIT) 
MICRO PRINT CENTRONICS INTERFACE 

'FOXLINK'. Cables and software that enable 
you to transfer files between 8- tut and PC or ST 

PC KIT £25 - ST KIT £19 
72* 3V DISK DRIVE INTERFACE (Mr! (o onf«-J£ssoo 
T-34 1 30XE Polish tank bartJe game 
ZONE PATROL The shoot 'e*n up game Alan 

never released 
PRINT LAB XE (requires 130XE) 

1 020/ 1 0PS; £ pson prime r utility di $k 
1050 DRIVE MECHANISMS - New/unused 
lactory sealed units direct from Atari USA £25.00' 

(why repair when you can just replace 7 ) each 



E25 0O 
£19,95 

cio.oc 

£2fl-0O 



C5.9S 
£4.95 
£6.94 



NOW PRINT IN COLOUR ON YOUR lQ29f 

1029 COLOURED RIBBONS 

Black £6.50 - Red, Blue, Yellow £7.54 



FULL DETAILS OF ALL THE SPECIAL OFFERS IN DATA-BASE CATALOGUE No. 
60 pence for a single copy or £3.60 {postal order) UK 
for 12 issues. £8.00 Europe; £10 elsewhere Air 



16 



The TIPSTER 



it'* 



Fooled Yd/ 

It's only some help needed! 

HELP 1VIE! 



Now it is my turn to seek help for an Adven- 
ture please. In LEATHER GODDESSES 
OF PHOBOS 

(a] Where can I find the Photo of Jean 
Harlow? 

(bj I low do I get pastThorbast when out- 
side the spaceship (even when I get his 
sword I cant do It). 



ooo 



IT'S OVER 

And so ends this guest edition of The Tipster. 
The next one is up to you. Christmas is over, 
this is 1 995 and we need another whole year 
of tipping, hinting, mapping arsd salving from 
you lot Dig out your favourite games and tell 
us how you crack them. Dig out you not so 
favourite games, work oat when? you got 
stuck, and ask for help - someone knows the 
answer. 
Wrile it all down - send It all in. There were 
whispers that The Tipster was going to take U 
easy in 1 995 but that's not the case is it? Bury 
him with mail - start writing now! 

Send it all to: 

THE TIPSTER 

NEW ATARI USER 

P.O. BOX 54 

STAFFORD 

ST16 1DR 




Ih 



WRITING A GAME 



programming a game 
of your own can be 
quite complex but it 
need not be difficult. 
Ann O'Driscoll shows 
how to get started 
with a simple idea 



Writing your own computer game is 
not as difficult as sume people im- 
agine. The trick is to start simple 
and build it up from there. This article ex- 
plains how programming a small, uncompli- 
cated maze game might be approached, While 
it doesn't have "extras" like user defined 
graphics. It does have some of the features 
found in "real" games like sound, scoring and 
a reason for playing. In other words, the 
framework Is there for the program bo be 
developed Into your own personalised game. 
In approaching any program from scratch, 
It's usually a good idea to Jot down a few ideas 
on what you want the program to do. before 
you go near the keyboard. This would include 
deciding on the type of game screen you want. 
Whether movement routines should use the 
keyboard or joysticks and, of course, the over- 
a LI purpose of the game itself. For instance, in 
a maze game the starting point might be a 
character who can" I move through walls, but 
a -ftcr that a number of scenarios are possible: 



Should something follow the character. SO 
that he has to find the way out quickly? Or 
perhaps he should collect "treasure" from cer- 
tain places within the maze? Should there be 
a time limit? What happens when the player 
wins or loses? 

Let's assume that, following an analysis like 
this, we decide that our game will have the 
following features: The "'action 1 ' will take place 
on a Graphics 1 screen. The "'#" symbol will 
be used for the walls of the maze and the 
Inverse "*" symbol to represent the maze char- 
acter. We will put "dots" or rull stops on all 
the places in the maze where there Is not a 
wall, and the character, moved with the Joys- 
tick, must move over or "eat" the dots, The 
game will end when all the dots are gone, A 
timing routine will be included to give some 
Incentive to play, and we'll put a "Play again" 
option In too. Next, we'll put these Ideas into a 
program, step by step: 



STEP 1 - Build the Maze 

The maze shape is defined by the DATA 
statements at LINES 800-940, with each 
DATA line representing a separate row of the 
maze. The "#" symbol Is used for the walls 
and the "." for the spaces In between. Because 
the maze Is symmetrical, the first line is the 
same as the last, the second is the same as 
the second last, and so on. Our masse is 15 
rows long (15 lines of data) and 15 columns 
wide [15 character spaces across for each 
line), 'fills size just about suits the Graphics 1 
screen (20 long by 20 across); we might 



12 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page 6's New Atari User 



13 



change the maze size if we used 
another graphics mode. 
LINE 25 of the program DIMensfons a 
string called WS which is big enough 
to hold a single row of the maze data. 
LINE SO puts the computer into 
Graphics 1 mode (and turns off the 
cursor) and LINE 60 places the maze 
data on this screen: The "RESTORE 
800" command simply tells the com- 
puter to start looking for the data at 
LUTE 800. The FOR NEXT loop reads 
the first row of data (at LINE 800) and 
prints it on the screen beginning at 
column 2, row 2. It then reads the next 
row (LINE 8 10} and prints this under- 
neath at column 2. row 3 and so on 
until all the data has been read. 



STEP 2 - Create the 
Eater and move him 



fcH 


1 


ZS 


2 


UK 


3 


HH 


A 


MC 


5 


YE 


6 


FD 


7 


NN 


8 


HH 


25 


71 


38 


KU 


35 


BO 


46 


CZ 


At 


Cfl 


50 


C,G 


5? 


av 


60 



OK 
HH 
10 

VJ 
CH 
BG 

PE 

OT 

TK 
KH 



IA 
K0 
CO 
JZ 
ML 
UH 
OP 



Our "eater" Is very simple - an Inverse 
"•" character which we decided on ear- 
lier. LINE 30 sets up a string called A$ 
to hold the character. This means that, 
if we want to show the eater on the 
screen, we can use "? #o";A$"' to do so. 
LINE 80 sets the Initial co-ordinates or 
"starting point"' for the eater at the middle of 
the maze (column 9 and row 9) and prints. It 
on the screen, 

In BASIC games, simple animation or move- 
ment effects can be achieved by printing a 
character, rubbing It out and then printing it 
again at a new position. "Rubbing out" either 
means putting back the old background or 
something else. In this program, we want our 
character to "cat" [he dots as he passes over 
them, so we will print a space when he leaves. 
Also, if he moves Into a blank area to begin 
with, we will "erase 1 " him when he goes by 
reprinting the space again. LINE 35 sets up a 
string called 05 to hold one blank character 
to be used in the rubbing out routines. Now 



m r 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 m n i m 1 1 1 miu 

II WHITE b GflHE 

n by Ann D'Driscoii 

a A HAZE DEMO 

» -- 



m 
tt 
tt 

H NEW ATARI U&lt;5ER - FEB 19*5 

iH i iunii nm iiii i i n iiiii i ii m i i min imiii m 



space 

beat 



HS: P 



REM 
REN 
REM 
REH 
REM 
REH 
»EM 
REH 
DIM US (15): REM Haze Wall 
DIM flStl) :A5="Q":REK Eater 
dim bScd:bS=" ":REH Blank 
BT=10B:ftEM Initial tide to 
REM 

GRAPHICS 1 SPOKE 752,1 
REM — DROH MAZE HALLS 
RESTORE 800: FOR 11 = TO 14 S REAR 
OSITIOH 2,11 + 2:? t16;HS;NEKT N 

63 REM PUT IN TIME TO BEAT 

70 POSITION 2,0:? «6j"best tine ";Bt 

7S REM PUT IN EATER 

80 K2=9:Y2=9: POSITION H2,Y2l? HGjflS 
a? REM — HAIT FOR KEYPRESS 

CHRStl2S);"* «f1:i« = Play KQ 
= End" 

IBB IF PEEK 1532791 &lt;&gt;&amp; A NO PEEK 15327*1 &lt; 

&gt;3 THEN IBB 

IBS IF PEEKC53279J=3 THEN GRAPHICS fl:P 

OKE 752,0;CLR SEND 

109 REM — BEGIN GAME SOUND 

lie FOR P=1BB TO STEP -4 : SOUND 8,P,1 

8 ,12: NEXT P 

II* REM 5ET TIMER 

115 ? CH R5I1251 :PQKE 1?,B:P0KE 20,8 

11? REM KrEHm-TJL^B^B^HHBMNNB^i^iW 

120 SC=B!GOTO 25B 

US' REN JOYSTICK ROUTINE 

15B 5=5TlCKtBJ : IF 5=15 THEN ISO 

±80 H2=H2+CS=7 AHP HZ&lt;16l-tS=ll A«» 



58 ? 



HZ 



we can use '? #6: IIS" to Indicate that the eater 
has left a particular screen position. 
The program uses X2 and Y2 to show the 
current column and tow positions of the eater 
and XI and Yl to show the previous or "old 
column and row positions. Moving the Joys- 
tick right or left updates the X2 position; up 
and down movements update the Y2 position. 
X2 and Y2 must keep within the maze limits 
too: Neither X2 or Y2 can fall below 2 or go 
above 16 because this is where we've put our 
maze on the screen. The compact routine at 
LINES 150-170 takes care of all of this. First, 
the computer Is told to stay at LINE 150 if ^ 
joystick is stationery (S= 15). LINE 160 a^ d&amp; 
to the value of X2 if the Joystick is pushed 





&gt;2J 






p* 


17B 


V2=YZ+ tS=13 AND ¥2&lt;16J-tS=14 AND V 




2?2J 






?l&gt; 


188 


POSITION Hl,Yii? B$JBS:REM Rub OUt 




Old POE 


ition 


re 


1.98 


LOCATE H2,Y2,Q;REM locate columi. 




ro»&lt; 


ascii code 


TR 


2S8 


IF Q 


=35 THEN SOUND B, ISO, 10, 8 ! FOR 




= 1 


TO 2B:HEHT D : SOUND 8, 8 , , ! K2=H1 : V 




2=Vl:(iOTO 25B:REH Hit wall 


HZ 


218 


IF 


=45 THEN SC=SC+l:REM Hit dot 


rn 


250 


POSITION HZ,Y2:PRINT 06;AS 


(JO 


26B 


IF SC-llB THEN 386 


JN 


2?0 


H1=K2: Y1=Y2 


oG 
HI 


280 

188 


GOTO 
REH 

T = IN 


150 


GAHF OUER : NO DOTS LEFT W 


T C CPEEK I19)*255 + PEEK C28J &gt; /50) 


OR 


310 


P=12«:IF T&lt;BT THEN BT=T:P=12 


HI 


320 


POSITION 12,8:? »6;BT;" " 


10 


330 


FOR 


N~l TO JiSOUHD B,P,18,8:F0R 0- 




1 TO 46: 


HEKT DISOUHD 8,0,0,B:HEXT N 


RK 
YL 


340 
799 


GOTO 
REH 


50 


DATA FOP. THE HAZE 1 


ZJ 


BBO 


DATA 


iiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiuat 


JM 


810 

8Z8 


RATA 
DATA 


tt, . . , , , o 




OS 


830 


RATA 


tt.u n.o 


HK 


041 


DATA 


tt I ■ ■ tt I tt &lt; tt ■ tt • I rtt 


J5 


ase 


DATA 


tt . 1 it 1 1 f . tt i ffl . SHSt . tt 


6Y 


860 


DATA 




UH 


878 


DATA 


|| m ITT w tut ■ IUl . Jt If MTT 


BC 


880 


DATA 


tt. ■ ■ 1 .tt ,tt, . , - -tt 


Kfl 


BM 


RATA 


a.mm.s.n.ton.tt 


»L 


980 


RATA 


it. . . tt . tt . tt . tt ■ ■ ■ tt 


ttf 


fit 


DdTfl 


tt . tt .tt.tt 


JN 


928 


DATA 


■■ N4JBB 84)44 44|44 4#4f4 #4 


PD 
E5 


930 


DATA 




948 


DATA 


HIIHHIIItliimilHIIIltllT 



right (S=7)i provided X2 isn't at the rnaxfmum 
value. The same line subtracts 1 from the 
value of X2 if tlie joystick fa pushed left 
(5= II). provided X2 Is above the minimum. 
LINE 170 follows the same principles for up 
(S=14) and down (S=I3J movement, and up- 
dates Y2 according^. 

LINE 250 of the listing prints the eater at the 
new X2, Y2 position. LINE 270 then turns 
these co-ordinates Into the "old" co-ordinates 
so that ihc cater may be rubbed out, and 
LINE 280 sends the program back to get the 
next X2 and Y2 values. At this stage we are 
w &lt;dl on the way to completing the movement 
l°op routine, which now looks like this: 



LINE 190-170 Update X2 and Y2 

LINE 180 Rub out at XI. Yl 

LINE 250 Print eater at X2&lt; Y2 

LINE 270 Set XI =X2 and Yl = Y2 (i.e. 

store last positions) 

LINE 280 Go back to LINE 1 50 



STEP 3 -Put in the 
START Routine 

As LINE 80 has our eater stuck in the 
middle of the maze h now might be a 
good time to move him into the game 
by introducing the START routine- 
LINE 90 clears the text window and 
Invites the player to press the START or 
OPTION console keys. LINE lOO watts 
until one or other is pressed. LINE 10 S 
ends Lhe game if you press OPTION, 
olherwlsc the main play loop begins. 
LINE 110 has a short sound routine to 
get the player ready and then LINE 
120 "catapults" the eater into the mid- 
dle of the Joystick movement routine (to 
LINE 250). If you test the program at 
this stage you will find that, while the 
eater moves quite well, it erases every- 
thing it passes by - including the maze 
walls. Also, while it cats the dots, the 
"game 11 goes on forever, even when the screen 
is cleared, Wc can lake care of these problems 
if we check the eater's screen co-ordinates 
when he moves:- 



STEP 4 - Detecting 
Screen Positions 

Having updated the screen co-ordinates at 
LINES 160-170 and rubbed out the old loca- 
tion at LINE ISO, we next find out what is at 
Lhc eater's new screen position, Obviously, wc 
can't have him walking through the walls of 



14 



Page 6'S New Atari User 



Page 6's New Atari User 



IS 



the maze. We also want to know when a dot is 
"eaten". The Atari uses the LOCATE command 
til give the ASCII code for the character resid- 
ing at particular screen co-ordinates. It takes 
the form 

LOCATE column, row, ASCII cede 

All the ASCII codes are given at the back of 
your computer manual The ones we're in- 
terested In are the hatch symbol (ASCII =35) 
for the walls and the full stop symbol 
(ASC 11=46) for the dots, 

LINE 200 checks to see if the new position 
contains maze wall (Q=3SL As moving into a 
space occupied by the wall is not allowed, the 
computer gives a "disapproving" sound, Next, 
the "old" or last co-ordinates are restored - In 

_her words, the computer is told to forget 
about the proposed move and the wall co- 
ordinates are dropped. Then the program is 
sent on to LINE 250 

LINE 210 checks to see if the new position 
contains a full stop (Q=46). Our game specifi- 
cation says the asterisk character must "eat" 
or move over all the full stops, so we'll need to 
keep a track of when he meets these. The 
simplest way to do this is to have a counter or 
score which goes up by 1 when X2, Y2 hits a 
dot, LINE 2 10 does this, having set the score 
at before the game started (LINE 120). LINE 
250 prints the cater over the dot There are 
111 dots in the maze altogether. When the 
game starts, our eater is 'sitting' on a dot in 
the middle of the maze. This means he must 
eat 1 10 dots to clear the maze and end the 
game. LINE 260 sends the program to the 
game over routine when SC reaches 1 10. 
Otherwise, the XI and Yl co-ordinates are set 
up and the Joystick movement loop continues, 
as explained above in Step 2. 



STEP 5 - Put in a Timer 

As it stands, the game isn't much good be- 
cause, even though it works, there's no incen- 
tive to play - there are no "baddies", there's no 
10 



"high score", and it doesn't really matter if 
you take all day to clear the maze. With just 



few extra lines of programming, We can 



reetifc 



this by introducing a timing routine: 
LINE 115 sets two or the Atari's "realtime 
clock" registers (at memory locations 19 a n&lt; i 
20) to zero before the game starts. LINE 300 
reads them at the end to see how many 
seconds have elapsed - The contents of mem* 
ory location 20 go up by 1 every 1 /50 seconds 
and, when it reaches 255 (after 256/50 or 5.1 
seconds) it nudges memory location 19 up by 
one, goes back to itself and starts Increme- 
nting again. It follows that the value in mem- 
ory location 19, found by PEEK(i9), teUs us 
that that location 20 has gone from to 255 
that many times. Each time took 256/50 
seconds, so PEEK[19}X 256/50 plus 
PEEK(20)/5O gives us seconds taken to com- 
plete the game. This is what LINE 3O0 calcu- 
lates. LINE 310 compares this value with the 
previous "Best Time" (BT) and updates if 
appropriate. 



STEP 6 - Final Routines 

Now all that remains is for us to put in the 
"game over" and "play again" options. LINE 
330 looks after the two possible "'game over" 
sounds. The second value in the Atari's sound 
command controls the pilch. The game uses 
one pitch (P= 12) when the previous best time 
is bealcn and a different pilch (P= 120) other- 
wise. These values are set in LINE 310, The 
initial lime to beat is set at 1 00 in LINE 40, 
Finally. LINE 340 directs the program back t" 
LINE 60, the maze is redrawn and the compu- 
ter waits Tor START (new game) or OPTION 
(finish up) to be pressed - 

.. and that's about it Additional features like 
a title screen, obstacles which prevent a cIc * r 
run through the maze, or perhaps a "level 4 
"level 1" Is completed within a certain time - 
may all be incorporated OnCC the basic buJl d " 
ing blocks are in place. 



DISK BONUS 



AN ADVENTURE DOUBLE! 

THE SINCLAIR EXPERIMENT 

by Antony Weir 

Somewhere in the "ea r i ol England, the notorious professor Sinclair works on his amazing discovery - 
Chronotoneiics - (hat's time travel to you and me. He has threatened to transport the Earth back to before the 
beginning ol nme f his demands are not mei. Realising thai this would mean the resurrection of the ZX-80, the 
WSO (World Security Organisation) sent you and a certain 'Miss X' to bring Sinclair to justice and destroy his 
mabhine. You we*e both caught by Sinclair's hoods. You have managed to escape, but Mkss X is still a prisoner 
Vqu rind yourself alone and unarmed in an unfamiliar town, with your companion to rescue and a mission still 
so complete... 

"he Sinclair Experiment is the usual type of text adventure with the standard two word vocabulary. Nouns can 
be shortened io just me first four letters but note that verbs musl be typed in lull, To play, simply boot the disk 
wilh Basic but ensure that the disk is left in the drive as the program accesses various files during play. 

There is both a Cheat mode and a Help facility. The cheat mode enables you to go direct to certain locations. 
While holding CONTROL, type LOG. Press ESC and type ESC CONTRO^. =. fallowed by a space. Then type 
in the number of the location you wis- to go to. 

There is a separate HELP program that car be called up from the main game. To use it, first save your current 
status (SAVE GAME). Now press P at the location where you need help. Remember me number and type HELP. 
You will see a menu giving you three types of due, Give your location number and you will receive some sort 
of hint as to what to do next You can then go back to the menu and select option E to return to the main program. 
Restore your position (LOAD GAME) and you can cany on. 

SPACEWRECK 

by John Young 

'n this adventure you find yourseli mafoensd on a wrecked spaceship drifting in as* asteroid belt, your objective 
is simply to get yourself rescued, 

Commands can be either one word or verb- noun, and you need only type the first four letters of each. The 
state of play can be saved to disk, this being advisable before doing anything that may be dangerous. The 
following is a list of often-used commands, but quite a few others ate possible. 

ONE WORD; NORTH (N). EAST (E). SOUTH (S), WEST (W), UP (U), DOWN (□), SAVE, LOAD (RESTORE}. 

INVENTORY (I), QUIT (Q) 

VERBWOUN: TAKE (GET). DROP (LEAVE), EXAMINE (LOOK). OPEN, CLOSE, FIT (FIX). REMOVE, GIVE 

II your attempt to communicate is not understood, try r&amp;phrasing it, and remember that all valid commands must 
make sense in two words. A last hint: EXAMine everything. 

£ mm it you have new played an adventure before you should find these two program* enjoyable. Gin them a gol 



THE ADVENTURE DOUBLE is available only on the New Atari User 
Issue 70 disk. Disk subscribers will have received their &lt;:opy with 
the magazine but the disk can be ordered separately for £2*95 from 
PAGE 6. P.O. BOX 54, STAFFORD. ST16 1DR, Access or Visa 
orders can be accepted by telephone on 07 S5 213928 
THE NAU ISSUE DISK OFTEN CONTAINS EXTRA BONUS PROGRAMS NOT LISTED IN THE MAGAZINE 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page 6's New Atari User 



17 



TYPE-IN &amp; DISK 




MM 



THE CAVES OFCTULHI 



Robert de Letter 
demonstrates with 
his first ever game 
that you do not need 
fancy machine code 
programming to 
write a quality game 
-just imagination 
and Turbo Basic! 



Ever since I bought my first Atari in 
1984 1 always wanted to write a game. 
Some utilities I wrote have been pub- 
lished in Page 6 as has a word game (Guess 
and Count). Some time ago I finally decided to 
write a platform or run and jump' game. 
The Caves of Ctulhl Is based around a Ger- 
man Public Domain program The Dungeons 
of Xotha'. I always loved that game so I de- 
cided to use it as a basis and enhance the 
original to use some of the excellent features 
of the Atari. I rewrote the whole character set, 
added a wizard, some more dungeons, most 
sound effects, booby traps, magic and an exit 
to the next eawc. After a couple of weeks [ 
decided to re -write the whole program in 



Turbo Basic to try and speed it up. ] now 
really have seen the speed of that language! 

One of the reasons 1 like this game is thqt it 
is written for us older people! No dull chasing 
monsters and no clock whose only purpose is 
to reach the aero countor in no time at all. If 
you think, however, that it is going to be easy, 
think again It isn't! 

There are no fancy player missile graphics 
controlled by machine language as all player 
movement is done by COLOR. PLOT and LO- 
CATE commands. The COLOR command 
accepts both Atasel and Internal codes, so 
several colours can be plotted In a Graphics 1 
screen. Turbo Basic allows plenty of speed 
using just Basic commands, in fact In some 
sections 1 have had to slow the program 
down. 



THE STORY SO FAR ... 

In the Hyborean age, Cohnan was sent out 
by his King to find the Necronarnicon". the 
fabled book of death, a book that gives you 
unlimited power. Cohnan has journeyed far to 
recover the book which was last located In the 
Cthonka hills, but one of the Guardians of the 
book, the beautiful witch Winonkha. has mis- 
k-d Cohnan and he is stranded in The Caves 
of Ctulhi", He must go through 10 caves be- 
fore he can enter the Dragon Room where be 
believes the book may lie. 

Ilie doors of each cave are guarded and can 
only be opened by bribery. Cohnan (you) 
must collect 10 gold pieces in every cave be- 







18 



Page 6's New Atari User 



fore you can open the door to the next 
dungeon. In each level you also have to meet 
the invisible Wizard who will give you an 
amulet. You can open the door without 
amulet, but don't forget it. there is no way 
back! When you have reached the final cave 
you must give CTULHI 10 amulets to become 
Free. 

Finding the wizard is not a difficult task, but 
the wizard is placed randomly in every eavc. 
The sooner you meet him the higher your 
score is. In the seventh dungeon you have the 
chance to gain an extra amulet. I will not tell 
you how, although it's very easy you will 
probably never find it!. 
Once an amulet is yours 
It is placed at the top of 
the screen. In the third 
and ninth caves you 
Bain a life. I realise, pro- 
fessional players do not 
need an extra life but 
other players may soon 

Page 6's New Atari User 



lose interest if they die rime and time again. 
You can only move left and right but you can 
jump by pressing the trigger and moving the 
Joystick in the desired direction. Most caves 
need a certain strategy in order to collect all 
the gold pieces. You will find teleporters, dis- 
appearing bridges and some nasty things. 
That's really all I have to tell you about the 
caves. 



KEEPING SCORE 

At the top of the screen you will sec (from left 
to right): your score, the amulei symbol. 
Turbo Basic s internal clock (TIMES) ... just to 
sec how long it takes to find the wizard, your 
lives and the number of the cave. 

The less time it takes to open the door the 
higher your bonus points are. If you quit the 
game and decide to play again press RESET 
before running the program again. 

As I said earlier 1 have had to slow the game 
down but if you want to sec Turbo Basic in all 
Its glory leave out some of the PAUSE com- 
mands, especially PAUSE %2 In line 200. 

I had originally planned to have a guod fight 
against the dragon in the final cave but J ran 
into a memory conflict. If somebody has a 
solution, please let me know. 

The game starts with a smashing Curtain 
Raiser' written by Daniel Lea and published 
earlier in New Atari User. Ifyou are still an 
avid user of our wonderful 8-bit computer. 
Daniel, I wonder ifyou have more of these 
magnificent Htde gems? 
So. that's all. Enjoy the caves and Good Luck. 



THE LISTING 

The Caves of Ctulhi is included on this issue's disk 
ready to run, Ifyou would like to type in the listing 
(remember it is luritten in Turbo Basic) a printed copy 
with full TYPO 3 codes can be obtained free of charge 
from Neui Atari User. Check the inside back cover for 
details of him* to obtain a copy. 



19 



Features 

and 






THE HISTORY OF ATARI 



Atari have gone 
from being a small 
games console 
manufacturer to 

being a small 

games console 
manufacturer. But 
something must 
have happened 
along the way? 
______ _____ 
_________-____ 
investigates and 
reports 



Firstly, before you read tills article, J 
would like to apologise for a phrase in 
an article I wrote for New Atari User a 
few Issues ago which has been very badly 
received in France, The line "I hate French 
people, they only think of themselves" was 
written when I was very angry at certain 
French companies not supporting the Atari. 
Let me ensure French readers that 1 am very 
proud to be French and l"m also very proud of 
my culture, so don't worry French readers I'm 
not a threat to I he nation! 

Now the purpose of this article is to 
take a look how Atari have fared over 
the years, so let's begin at the very 
beginning and take a trip through good times 
and bad to see where we are today. 



1944 



Nolan Rusfmell is bom. 



1 Q Z Q Nolan Bushnell studies elec- 

I 7 07 tneity in his college. During 
the summer of the same year, he Lakes a Job 
in charge of an attraction park. He will say 
later; 1 always had a weakness for frivolity. 
So I told myself that technology could also 
lead to pleasure ..." 



1971 



inspired by the computer work 
of his colleague at university. 
Nolan Bushnell creates and manufactures 



first video game "COMPUTER SPACE". Too 
advanced for its own epoch, lhe game will be 
a commercial fajlurc- 

1Q 7 O Not discouraged by this down- 
7 / £ turn. Nolan Bushnell founds 
his own company which he calls ATARI 
(which in Japanese means checkmate In the 
GO game) and releases "PONG" on the mar- 
ket. A I this time the market was represented 
only by the arcade games that you can see in 
a pub or bistro. PONG was an incredible suc- 
cess! 1/Cgcnd says that Nolan Bushnell cre- 
ated ATARJ with $250, a bottle of rum and a 
garage. He will say later: "Everything is true 
except the garage, it was the bedroom of my 
daughter that I trans/ormed into a laboratory.' 

I 7 / O ecssful thai ATARI decides to 
start developing a VIDEO COMPUTER SYS- 
TEM' 1 while continuing to release new games 
onto the arcade market. 

1 Q *J / ATARI releases the "VIDEO 
I T I O COMPUTER SYSTEM 2600' or 
"VCS 2600". This new video game machine is 
so successful that by 1984 18 million units 
will have been sold In the world and by 1990, 
25 million! 

1 QTfO With the sales of the VCS2600 
I 7/v and its controlling position in 
the arcade market, ATARI has become a S15 
million empire |n the same year, Nolan Bush- 
nell sells ATARJ to WARNER COMMUNICA- 
TIONS. A condition of the sale is that Nolan 
Bushnell wont form any company able to 
compete with ATARI within the next 8 ycars. 

7 A WABNE R &lt; now owrjer o r 

7 / \J ATARI, decides to release the 
Q70 ATARJ 400/800 computers 
7/7 but only in the American and 
Canadian markets. The development of these 
Computers started under Nolan Bushnell's 
presidency but WARNER BROS, decide to 
accelerate their final release (simply because 



APPLE had not yet released the APPLE II and 
WARNER didn't want to delay their entry Into 
this new market}. In a few years time the 
400/800 will be sold in Europe. 

@70 Even though they are very i'x- 
7/7 pensive, the ATARI computers 
QOA find their public. The fact that 
7 U they have great graphics (128 
colours with the CT1A chip), four sound chan- 
nels and incredible games (STAR RAIDERS 
was already there!) makes them much more 
attractive than the APPLE II (one colour and 
no sound). At this time, with the 400/800 
computers and the VCS26Q0, ATARI really 
was the master of the computer games 
market. 

1 Q QO ATARI decides to release a 
I 7 w£ new range of home computers, 
the XL line. Totally compatible with the 
400/800 range, the XL will have a new 
graphic chip - the GTI A chip - which can give 
256 colours at the same time; a revised Oper- 
ating System and a new design. The first 
machine to see the light of day should have 
been the ATARI 1200XL. In parallel with the 

1200XL. ATARI released the VIDEO COMPU- 
TER SYSTEM 5200. Totally compatible with 
the VCS2600. the 5200 has improved 
graphics and sound and competes with the 
CBS COLECOVISION system in the United 
States. 

1 A *k ^ ATARr 1 200XL has not 

I 7Uv really been well received by 
(he critics, ATARI therefore decide to speed up 
lhe launch of the 60 0XL. the 800XL. the 
1450XL and its disk drive based version, the 
I450XLD. Ilie sales didn't lake off and to the 
tell the truth, the real winner in the home 
computer market this year is die COMMOD- 
ORE 64, We must even admit that a lot of 
400/800 users have gone over to the COM- 
MODORE camp. Even Sid Meier, the world 
famous programmer of Micro prose, moved to 
the C64. The ATARI machines were really 
equal to (and in graphics and sound even 



20 



Page rj's New Atari User 



Page 6's New Atari User 



21 



better than) the C64 and i he price was the 
same so why did Atari not succeed? The C64 
was, of course, totally new and the ATARI XL 
machines were called by the critics the "new 
old range of ATARI computers" but that's not 
all. 
Do you know a chap named Morgan, James 
Morgan (not Bond, James Bond?)? This man 
was president of ATARI for one year and a 
half. When WARNER realised what a disaster 
the launch oTthe XL range has been, they 
decide to engage James Morgan who was. at 
the time, president of Philip Morris, the 
cigarette manufacturer. When James Morgan 
arrived, he made redundancies (under WAR- 
NER there were 9500 employees and when 
Morgan left then: were only 5000 left! Unable 
la reduce the cost of manufacture of the com- 
puters, the first decision he took - still very 
contested today - was to freeze all hardware 
and software development for three months. 
This period was really crucial, as all the com- 
petitors were launching new improved hard- 
ware and ATARI was definitely losing the bat- 
tle against COMMODORE, as it turned out, 
forever. Morgan, attempting to stay In the 
market of the £500 home computer where 
COMMODORE was predominant, costs ATARI 
a one year delay In the market. Also, a bad 
choice of chip manufacturer means that the 
XL machines are only available for seven 
months of 1984 and the Impossibility of mak- 
ing a profit In 1984 leads WARNER to sell 
ATARI. 

1 ft A hi June, at The Consumer 
I /0"? Electronic Show in Chicago, 
ATARI releases Its new VIDEO GAME SYS- 
TEM: THE ATARI 7800. The critics said only 
one thing terrifying". The ATARI CLASSIC 
possibilities In sounds and graphics were 
really surpassed. The ATARI 7800 will enjoy 
some success In its own market, before the 
Sega and Nintendo Invasion. Even in 1994, 
the 780O is still a good buy, with many Incre- 
dible and recent games. During July and Au- 
gust, negotiations take place between TRA* 
Ml EL TECHNOLOGY, a company crcalcd by 

22 



Jack Tramiel (ex-president of COMMQDORpi 
and WARNER COMMUNICATIONS which has 
decided to sell ATARI to anyone who can pay 
for it (During 1984. WARNER needed a ] ot of 
capital to finance a fight against Rupert Mur- 
doch, the press magnate, who wanted to take 
control of WARNER BROS.J. 

One month before these negotiations, ATARI 
announces catastrophic results. In 1993, fo r 
each dollar of material sold, ATARI loses 50 
cents and Its market activity is equal to only 
half of the activity of 1982. ATARI lost 538.6 
million dollars on a turnover of 1. 1 billion 
dollars. In the first four months of 1984, the 
loss was "only" 35 million dollars. ATARI had 
drifted a long way from the 323 million dollar 
profit and 2 billion dollar turnover of 1982, 

An agreement was signed with Jack Tramiel 
for Warner to sell Atari Tor $240 million but 
the transaction was very unfavourable for 
WARNER which was not receiving actual 
cash, only stocks. 

One week only after having bought ATARI. 
Tramiel made 900 redundancies in the 
States, There were only 200 people left in the 
Sunnyvale headquarters (only financial ser- 
vices, development and the directors]. The 
factory in El Paso (Texas) closed and the con- 
tract with the firm which was manufacturing 
the 800XL was broken. The 800XL would. 
henceforth, be manufactured in Taiwan. Tra- 
mie] said 'The video games market, as the 
home computer market. Is still full of possibi- 
lities, and we had to give ATARI a new men- 
tality for a new departure". 

1QOC During the Consumer Electro- 
I 7 00 nic Show in Us Vegas (only 
six months after the purchase of ATARI by the 
Tramiel Family). ATARI was showing six new 
computers: the ATARI 65XE. XEM, XEP and 
the ATARI 130XE for the eight bits (Only the 
65XE and the 1 30XE will be released) and the 
ATARI 520ST and 1040ST for the sixteen bits. 
This was a real declaration of war against 10M 
and APPLE - a real sixteen bit at the price of 
'.\w old ATARI 800! a Rghl thai ATARI 90 
win in Europe. 1985 represents the last year 



of disk based software produced by ATARI for 
the 8 -BIT 



1986 

erect career. 

1987 



The ST is a hot seller in 
Europe. The 130XE has a dis- 



At the Consumer Electronic 
Show in I^as Vegas (January), 
ATARI releases the XE VIDEO GAME SYSTEM 
which is nothing else than a 65XE with a 
separate keyboard and a light gun, The 
XEOS, as we call it. has never been a hot 
seller. ATARI could have modified the Internal 
hardware to Improve the graphics and sounds 
but they did nothing. The only good news 
from the launch of the XEGS comes from the 
facl that a lot of "oldies but goodies'' games 
become available on cartridge. Atari also re- 
leases the MEGA ST systems. In Europe, the 
ST really becomes predominant and the 
COMMODORE AMIGA is really far behind In 
Prance, many consider the XEGS Lr&gt; be an 
error, if ATARI really wanted a game system, 
why not simply Improve the ATARI 7800 
situation against Sega and Nintendo? 

1 Oft A ATARI rcleases the STACY 
l/OO which Is an ST portable. The 

critics will find it very useful but ATARI in- 
stead tries to create another new market in 
presenting the PORTFOLIO, an IBM compati- 
ble por!i±blc which is no bigger than a VCR 
tape! On the 8-BJT scene. ATARI presents the 
XF551 . the now famous double density drive. 

1 ftO The last cartridges are re- 
I 70 7 leased for the ATARI CLASSIC 
and the last hardware Improvement for the 
8 BIT Is the XEP80 extension which gives the 
CI.ASSIC real 80 column ability. Word proces- 
sing WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You 
Get) is no longer science fiction for 8- BIT 
owners. ATARI also releases the LYNX (de- 
veloped by EPYX). a portable colour video 
game system, and improves the ST internal 
hardware: The ST becomes the STE (4096 
colours etc.). 



000 Mo more development for the 
7 /U ATARI CLASSIC computers. 
00 yj ATARI WW release the ATARI 
7 /*» TT, the FALCON and the 
JAGUAR. ATARI will also make a lot of effort 
to release great games for the LYNX (which is. 
as the 7800 was, a success even if the sales 
stay way behind Sega and Nintendo). 

I 7/V same way as the XL/XE with 
most companies announcing their last ST title 
(and many more not even bothering). ATARI 
concentrate entirely on the Jaguar. Manufac- 
turing is now done by IBM and games are 
developed by outside companies. 

A itl ^\ With the exception of the 
f\ I ll \J ATARI CLASSIC and the 

THCM9 ATAKI sr il sccms that ' 1n the 

1 1 1 M ■ more recent years. ATARI has 
released a Jot of machines which haven't been 
a great success but have found a small pub- 
lic. Can we hope that ATARI will be. as In the 
past, one of ihc top video games enterprises 
with the Jaguar? I would hope so, as the 
Jaguar has had some incredible reviews in 
France and In the Stales But Atari have only 
this year to get it right as companies like Sony 
and Nintendo will launch machines as good 
as the Jaguar by the end of the year. These 
companies can afford to spend more on 
advertising than Atari's entire turnover. 

1 A Wil1 ATARI J oin c °™™dore 
I 77 w (who would have expected 
them, to go into liquidation?) or will they final- 
ly turn their success with Invention into the 
long awaited successs In the market place? 



I hope you have enjoyed this travel through 
ATARI history. In my next article I will explain 
everything about the cartridges released by 
ATARI for the 8 BIT. A lot of mysteries will be 
solved. You will know everything (references, 
revisions, boxes and different packaging, un- 
available cartridges etc.). Sec you then! • 






Page 6's New Atari User 



Page 6's New Atari User 



23 



The CLASSIC 




Z09&amp; 



As part of the latest cultural exchange 
between Earth and AtariS we have 
agreed to take part tn a musical show- 
case an the planet Demon, known throughout 
the Classic PD Zone as the Planet of Song. 
Here Is the complete showcase Jnym Earth 



SWEET MUSIC 



Let's start with music that owes its very 
being to the Atari computer. MUSIC SHOW 
showcases music specifically written for com- 
puter games and comprises a collection of 28 
music tracks taken from 16 commercial 
games or the 1580s. 

After a very Impressive introduction, featur- 
ing a colourful kaleidoscope pulsating to the 
main music From Draconus, you are pre- 
sented with the first of two menus. At these 
menus you can play popular tracks by Adam 
Gil more, Chris Murray, Rob Hubbard and a 
host of other Atari 8-bit programmers. The 
tracks come from games such as Winter 
Olympiad HB, Draconus, BMX Simulator, 
Submission, Red Max, Warhawk, etc. 
Obviously, if you own most of the games then 
Music Show will not have anything new to 
offer you. I suppose there is still the advan- 
tage of having all the tracks together on one 
disk, 

If you don't own many of these games and 
you're a fan of computer music then you 
really should listen Uj some of the tracks 
included. There are six excellent tunes from 
Draconus, two from Milk Race which are not 
to be missed, and some excellent main 
24 Page 6' s New Atari User 



themes from Storm. Extirpator and Jet Set 
Willy. 

Music Show is a good disk for showing off 
your Atari 8-bifs musical capabilities. 

CLASSIC PD ZONE RATING ; 73% 



AND THE BAND 
PLAYS ON... 

If you prefer music that's not written for 
computer games you can check out a couple 
uf other music disks. 

MUSIC FLAYER I contains 18 tracks - 9 
classical and 9 contemporary. They range 
from compositions by Bach and Beethoven to 
modern rock tracks. You simply move the 
cursor up and down the list of tracks and 
select one by pressing Return. Once selected, 
you move onto the main playback screen- 
Here the track is played both audibry and 
visually, A large horizontal graphic equalizer 
pulsates to the track whilst an on-screen 
keyboard displays the notes being played. 

MUSIC PLAYER 2 is exactly the same 
program, only the tracks arc different. This 
time there are 14 tracks for you to enjoy. 

Overall, the Music Player disks are quite 
enjoyable, The graphic equalizer and on- 
screen keyboard certainly bring life to the 
tracks. Nothing new, but a good effort never- 
theless. 



CLASSIC PD ZONE MING: 
MU8ICPIAYER1;7Q% 
MUSIC PLAYER 2: 69% 



AND ON.. 



Kcmal Ezcan of KE-Soft is known to enjoy 
composing music on his Atari 8-bit. If you 
own any of his PD or commercial programs 
von will no doubt have heard his work, 

SUPER SOUND contains the Supersynth- 
esizcr file player by Kemal Ezcan and a collec- 
tion of 26 musical tracks. Some of the tracks 
are good, some are average and some, unfor- 
tunately, are awful. Just listen to the terrible 
versions of the Dallas theme and Axel F. - 
you'll soon be reaching for the power switch 
at the back of your computer (after you've had 
a good laugh). 

Thankfully, most of the tracks are either 
good or average. All of them are written in 
BASIC so could easily be used In your own 
programs. They range from original composi- 
tions to cover versions of popular songs (Ox- 
ygens Part 2, Telstar. Spanish Eyes. Popcorn, 
etc.). A good example of a musical showcase 
programmed In BASIC, 

CLASSIC PD ZONE RATING: 67% 



...AND ON! 



For many, the name Gary Gilbertson con- 
jure 5 up images of wonderfully original com- 
positions. If you have experienced the songs 
during the opening sequences of Datasoffs 
Alternate Reality series then you'll know whal 
lo expect from the next disk. 

A.M.P* MUSIC is a demo disk of eight 
songs, all written by Gary Gilbertson. Play- 
back is via Philip Price's Advanced Music Pro- 
cessor (A.M.P.). Back in 1982, Price and Gil- 
bertson authored the now classic shoot -cm- 
up Tail of the Beta Lyrae (released by Data- 
most in 1983). A.M.R V3.0 came out soon 
after. Next came many more versions of 
AM. P. and a heisl of new stings throughout 



1982 and 1983. Their greatest work was still 
to come. Alternate Reality: The City was re- 
leased by Daiasoft In 1985, Gary Gilbertson 
went on to write the music for Alternate Real- 
ity: The Dungeon (1986). Philip Price pro- 
duced many different versions of A.M. P. (I 
believe VI 1.4 was his Anal version), 

Gary Gilbertson's work Is impressive no mat- 
ter which version of A.M. P. is utilized for play- 
back. The mix of pnigramming and musical 
talent Is there for all to see on A.M. P. Music. 

In action AM. P. is a Joy to watch as well as 
listen to. It centres around a black screen and 
four thin bars. These are coloured blue, pur- 
ple, red and green. Each represents a channel 
of sound during playback. They move left and 
right across the screen as the notes change, 
and Increase and decrease in height depen- 
dent On the level of volume. 

The early versions of A,M.P. look basic. The 
bars are too thin and look like cocklail sticks. 
They flash quickly and are hard lo follow at 
times. The mid-late versions of A M.P. are 
much more impressive and very similar in 
presentation. They begjn with a tide screen 
displaying the version number and sting tjtlc. 
The playback screen is more polished. The 
bars are thicker [they look like coloured pen- 
cils) and their movement is smoother. There 
fs also the advantage of timed lyrics which are 
displayed at the centre of the screen line by 
line superimposed over the bars. It all works 
very well! 

The eight songs on the disk are split into two 
groups: Four from 1982 (with playback on 
early versions of A.M. P,) and four from 1983 
(played on the more familiar version). All eight 
songs on the disk are excellent. The four from 

1983 are quite simply superb? Here are some 



with 
Stuart Murray as 
your Tour Guide 



Page 6's New Atari User 



25 




NORTH OF SCOTLAND ATARI USER GROUP 



brief descriptions beginning with those from 
1993: 

Face Is a long collection of different pieces. It 
sounds very much like a Star Trek movie 
soundtrack, jPasstonaiefy and All Were /are 
wonderfully bouncy tunes with sing-a-long 
lyrics. You can't help but Join in! The final 
track from 1 983 is Say the Things, It is a love 
song with humorous lyrics, e.g. 

"Can this reatly be. 
You're eighteen 
I'm ninety-three. 
It must be toise' 

The lyrics for Passtonalely, All Were land 
Say the Things have the advantage of high- 
lighted syllables whilst each line Is displayed. 
This allows you to sing-a-long with ease. 

The four 1983 tracks alone make the disk 
excellent value for money, however there is 
more A.M.P. magic to enjoy wll.h the songs 
from 1982 Included as a bonus, Alien is a 
spooky, unpredictable instrumental track 
with great atmosphere. A nab Navy and Past 
Navy are again instrumental (racks. They are 
both very fast and sound like part of a laser 
lightshow. Post Navy is longer and has more 
going on- It even slows dnwn in the middle 
and transforms into a love song. 

Frog sounds like a song from a stiigc music- 
al. It has some lyrics which scroll slowly 
acmss the top of the screen (unfortunately 
not In tempo with the music). You could see 
Philip Price was moving towards his more 
familiar version of A.M. P, at the time. 

With eight excellent songs together on one 
disk, A.M.P. Music Is outstanding both in 
quality and value for money. If you enjoy 
computer music you really should get this 
disk. Gary Gilbertson is a master at work! 

CLASSIC FD ZOJVE RATING: 88% 



MORE A.M.P. MAGIC 

If you would like to hear more A.M.. P. tracks 
by Gary Gilbertson then check out MORE 
PASSIONATE MUSIC. It contains the four 
songs he wrote for Datamost CRobounan'. 
Airstrlke 1 "Cosmic Tunnels" and "Monster 
Smash") as well as a first cut of "Alternate 
Reality' which sounds nothing like the final 
version, Also on the disk is a very interesting 
text file containing a brief history of A.M.P. 

CLASSIC PD ZONE SATING: 84% 



J hope qw friends from AtartS enjoy Earth's 
musical shoivcase. Let's Jitst hope that when 
we attend the Piidosian showcase there Is no 
need to use our special-edition AtrAbartS 
sound deflectors. The last time these were 
made StAr^dard issue uxis during a mission 
back on Earth many, many years ago. The 
mission was to Stafford UK, where three Air 
AtartS representatives had to negotiate with 
Page 6 Publishing. The editor was playing his 
CD's when they arrived! Only one representa- 
tive returned to headquarters, and he was on 
the edge of insanity grasping his ears and 
pleading far silence. IMitst have been one of 
those Scottish bands (ike Runng! Ed.j 

Say &amp; fond, '8-btt arid proud/' 

The disks reviewed have been: 
DISK 69 - MORE PASSIONATE MUSIC 
DISK 131 -A.M,P. MUSIC 
DISK 1 72 - MUSIC SHOW 
DISK 206 - MUSIC PLAYER 1 
DISK 21 3 MUSIC PLAYER 2 
DISK DS61 ■ SUPER SOUND * 



FUTURA 



THE NOSAUG NEWSLETTER 



Regular Column* 

ft 8-BIT NEWS: Ail the fetes' XUXE n*ws from around to 
world 

ft HARDWARE WAREHOUSE: Hardware protects. Hitman 
and revvtn 

6 SOFTWARE SCEHE: DutaM nvmtt of ttv latest soft- 
ware releases 

A ADDING A MOUSE: Using a mouse turn your Atari fl-taf 

■ft fl-BIT TRfVIA; Interesting and humorous trivia about your 
XL/XE 

■o SLA MM W: The Sound Khxiitdf Ptotestional #knt)ri 

* FUTURA FEEDBACK: Answers to your questions 
ft THE TURBO BAStC FLYER: P™rammra «i4"jwi from 

me USA 
ft ATARI B-BIT BOOKSHELF: Information and reviews ot 

XLr'XE publications 
ft UNTS AND CHEATS: Get the most from your games 

* FUTURA COMPETITION: Lots ot pmes to be won 

ft VCS FUTURA: The Column lor Atari YCS wrtnutiasts 
ft THE BUCK AND RED: Atari Jaguar Column 

Prices: £ 1 , 9 5 hc h - E 1 ior a 6-iss ue d i s k s u bse r i pi io n 
Back Issue* disks 1-13 arm stiil available at only £1,50 
Send El or a targe SAE for the Future Sample Issue 



Fbrth.cem.ing Column* 

ft DTP ATAftlQ: Desktop pubisning of&gt; your Atan B-Oit 

ft IF ONLY I COULD: Help and sdvee gn using your Atari to 

Its lull potential 
ft THE XLKE INTERVIEW: Interviews with prominent Hgtires 

in the Xl-XE wrtf 

The reaufar soturrtns are compimented by a selection ot new 
and original articles covering almost ovary aspect of Alan 8 Btf 
computing Of course, on each Fotura disk you'll tints lots of top 
quality PD software and new original Hoes programmed by 

Fvlura SUbSCnt&gt;er$ 

FUTURA ISSUE 14 -OUT MOW! 
FUTURA ISSUE 15 -OUT MARCH '95 



each 



Sp&amp;claf Offers; 

O Any 6 back issues for only £7.50 
O Ail 13 beck issues for only £1B 



Please make cheques p. o. 'a payable to S.J. Murray and send to 

NOSAUG, P.O. BOX 10001, PETERHEAD, AB42 6ZN 



NOSAUG - AN ATARI S-RIT USER GROUP! 



NORTH OF SCOTLAND ATARI USER GROUP 



NOSAUG PD LIBRARY NOSAUG PD CASSETTES 



OVER 150 DOUBLE-SIDED DISKS FEATUR- 
ING THE VERY BEST IN PUBLIC DOMAIN 
AND SHAREWARE FOR YOUR ATARI 3-BIT 

n» kttaeing Disks on anal telsttion Irom our aurmi catalogue 

THE NOSAUG PALETTE - 9 an prog/ams en one disk Pixel 

Arli&amp;t Us jxe 1 3 HBK A id. Ma-idaia GTiA Sketchpad, 

EjiqsI An, Graphcs Works hop. Escner Sketcher, Eton-a- 

Ekeich, Keysirotte Artel 
SPORTS EXTRAVAGANZA VOL 2 Fairway Challenge. 

fKifdie Ski. World Cupflfi. OlyrTpnc 1QQm Dash. Juxrp King, 

r^alson Frxitbo' Leag-is 
GREAT GAMES VOL % - Ardroion, Tactic Demo, Darttstar. 

Slack Hole, Eai et Fortune. Tndenl 
THE HALLE PROJECT 1»M 7-pari VegadeTK) 
MAGIC - ClCliont disk majgaiira Ingmlhfl USA 
A.I.M. - A a,' i imertaca Magazine disks All 'A issues are 

available, each packed with quality software 

All NOSAUG PD disks are priced at only £1.50 
each (any amount) 



Th# VQty best in public domain software 
on cassette for your Atari XL/XE 

Titles available includit. 
GAMES 1 -i , UTIUTlES, AMAZING DEMOS, MUSICAL 

MADNESS, KIDS FUN, FUTURA ISSUES 1 - 13 
Ncur titles available nous: 

UTILITIES 2 - Keystroke AriiH. Antic Music Processor 2 {with 
lour music track*). 1030 Cassette Inlay Lab* MaMr. Cur- 
reN Foreign Enc+ianas, Tr&gt;e TapesTSf , VidSo Tiller 

BEST Of ANTIC GAMES- Rebound, Urvcle Hsnry* Nuclear 
Waste Ourrp BiWdcop, Happylace fl«c6rsi. Wflrtifer Malcti. 
Mare Maniac, Ouatro, E- Racer 

BEST OF ANALOG GAMES ■ Planetary Dslenoe.ClOtid 
Hoop*' Badenon, Mazs War. Blast. Sncwpigw, Livewire, 
Raw In Space, Cotnc Glob Poir^ire, The Etectrods 

EDUCATION • Spell EM Alpha Run. Alphabet Train, The 
Counlm^ Gam*, Copy Cat. The Beading Program, 
Marathon Mahs MaJh Atlas*, fun Wlth^Vorc*. GuflSs My 
Njrrttar 

AH NOSAUG PD cassettes are supplied on quality 

C60 tapes complete with documentation. 

Price = £2 50 each 



Send £1 or a large SAE for a copy of the new NOSAUG PD catalogue 
Please make cheqves/p.o.'s payable to S.J. Murray and send to 

NOSAUG, P.O. BOX 10001, PETERHEAD, AB42 62N 



NOSAUG - AN ATARI S-HIT USER GROUP! 



26 



Pope 6"s New Atari User 



Page G's New Atari User 



27 



TURBO 

TTtfTPti-OIN]; 

MINI 

TURB0S2 



Quite a jew issues ago we re- 
ti\troduced the idea of jive-liners' 
or mint programs tn the hope thai 
iX would encourage you to submit 
your own collection of of mini* 
programs. Only a few of you did 
but Andy Guttlaume gives it a 
second go with this new coUection 
for you to enjoy. Don't expect 
miracles in a few lines but do 
expect a bii of fun for Just a few 
tninutes typing. 



HP 
tifl 




mWUTB TURBO MINT I - THTEftEFEHEMCF^B 




I ULH ^^^■3. 1 M:TirL i ai&gt;1llt!&gt;rT^H^^H 


NI 


3 HfcM 


Df 


20 FOR N=1530 TO 1791 S POKE N . RflNOCB) *r. 




2SMEHT N 


UK 


30 GRAPHICS lOlHOUE 1536,705,0 


a a 


48 FOR K-r.B TO 79: FOB Y-Kfl TO 171 


A7. 


50 COLOR RAND (8} +X1; PLOT X,Y 


di 


60 NLHT V:NEHT H 


KM 


70 MOVE 1536+RAN0C244) ,705,0: GOTO 70 



no 






L2x_. a TURBO MINI 2 - GUICK PMC'S 




fm^^m bv Andy guilijum* 


20 GRAPHICS KOiFOR H=1536 TO 1545 : RE 


AD 




B SPOKE N,B;KEKT M:DATA 20,8,8,65,127, 




127,65,0, 8,20 


MC 


30 PMG=«090B ! 5CH=OPEEK C001 : K = 180 ! Y-1HB 


MS 


40 FOR N=/.B TO 3 : POKE 53246+M , H» CM*1BJ 




:POKE 53256+M,X0fPOICE 704+N, CCN+XIJWXZ 

1 

SO MOVE ^CN,,PMG*iaZ4+ (256*M) , 256 1MOUE 


GM 




1536, PHG+1Q24+ (256WMJ + V T IB 


KG 


60 NEKT N SPOKE 54270 „ PMG/ 256 '. POKE 5327 




y^XSlPOKE bb^,5fl:P0KE 023, XI 



The first mini, which ] have called INTERFERENCE. 
Is Just another small GR. 10 effect that produces a 
sort of Interference pattern, 

LINE COMMENT/USAGE 

20 Setup Colour sets 

30-60 Draw screen {Random Dots) 
70 Move random colour set into palette and 

loop 



ivxxiNrr 2 

The next mini, MINI PMG, shows a 
quick method of setting up Player 
Missile Graphics. It uses the MOVE 
command to clear the PMG DMA 
area by moving blank screen data 
there. The loop serves to setup each 
of the 4 Players' Parameters and 
again uses MOVE to define them. 



LINE COMMENT/USAGE 

20 Pokes Graphics data into 1536 

onwards 

30 Setup variables 

40-50 Set X-position, Width, Colour 



.50 



60 



Erase then Plot Player 
Set PMBASE.GRACTU 
SDMCTL GPRIOR 



TVirisri 3 

Do you fancy a neat little demo 
effect in your programs? Well the 
next program. WAVE, shows a wave 
effect on a line of text. This Is accom- 
plished by a brute force method and 
again uses MOVE to copy the 
appropriate GR. 8 line to the relevant 
position. The positions are calcu- 
lated first and stored In arrays of 
Frame number and X-position of 
each angle for extra speed. Then 
eight lines of the message are drawn 
using the TEXT command and 
stored using MOVE, each line being 
shifted one pixel right to give a 
smooth effect. The program then 
loops for each line of the GR.8 data 
increasing the angle accordingly and 
loops around again to continue the 
effect. 

Try changing the Angle Step, AS at 
line 60 for smoother or steeper 
angles. 

by 

Andy Guillaume 

1VZX2MT 4 

To end off with, how about a crazy 
effect that's of no use except to scare 
your friends into thinking that thejr 
Atari has gone to pieces! The last 
mini turns your editing screen up- 
side-down, so you have to look at the 
picture upside-down in a mirror for 
normal viewing! 

A hardware feature 1 at CHACT 
(755J turns the characters upside- 
down, but IVe never thought of a use 
for it before. Change the 6 in line HO 
In 2 to slip into a different parallel 
universe! 



MY 1 REH 
QO 2 REH 
MI 3 REM 
BO 28 0EG 

(35?1 IP 
OM 30 FOR 

60-an ;" 
UQ 48 H1 = I 

-HI DIM 

XI 
YR 50 FTAO 
71 6B GRfiP 

:AM=XS; 

0T=3500 
MO 70 FOR 

E 
PS 00 HOVE 

e 

IJ 00 FOR 

US 180 FR = 

H*40)+F 

DE5Tj40 

ST. 11B IF 

IV 120 NEK 

AK=AH+3 

5K 130 GOT 



TURBO MINI 3 - HfiUE DEHO 



( Gui 1 1 atme 



1 GRAPHICS XOiDIM FTAB £359) , HTAB 

OKE 752, Zl 

AH-KB TO 353: POSITION KB, KB:? 3 

■ 1 

MTCCSIM(AN]*3B)) :f-B = Kl MOD 8 : H2 
OilF FR&lt;XG THEN Fft-FR+B : X2=H2- 

CAM)=FR*320:MTABtaH)=H2:llEXT OM 
HIC5 24: POKE 709&gt;&gt;i0:P0KE 710, XO 
SCM=DPEEKCeOI i DE5=SCN+ C91W401 . D 
8: 1*5 = 6: COLOR XI 
■ = EB TO 7!TEKT OO+MjRWO,' 
jHffl-'zHEXT H 
5CM,DAT,2S66:CLS «6:POKE 70?, 1 

H = EB TO 7 

FTAB CAN] :H2-XTABCAN3 :fR0H=DOT+ t 

R:0EST=DES+CNtt40&gt;+X2:MOUE FROM, 

: AH=am*A3 

fiM&gt;359 THEN AM=AM-360 

T N:AN=AM-(AS«7&gt; i IF AN&lt;K« THEM 

68 

90 



LINE COMMENT/USAGE 

30-50 S e1 up Array tables 

60-BO Setup GR.mode and "TEXT" data 

90-1 20 Loop tor each line to display 

..100 Get frame, position per angle 

,120 End loop. Reduce angle for next display 
frame 

130 Loop back to restart sequence 



JC 
MB 

MJ 








1 REH 


TURBO MIMI 4 










2 REH 


parallel Universe 




3 REM 

4 REH 


by flndy Gui 1 L aune 






III 


20 GRAPHICS K0:5CM=0PEEKCBBJ :DL=1S36:0 




LP=DL+K3 


zc 


30 POKE DL, 112! POKE DL+K1, 112 : POKE DL+ 




KZ.JJLX 


5A 


40 FOR M=23 TO KB STEP -XI 


OE 


50 POKE DLP,66:DP0KE DLP+X1 , 5CM+ CN*48) 




j[&gt;LP = DLP + KI 


KM 


Gfl MEKT M 


la 


70 POKE DLP,OS:DPQKE DLP+K1.DL 


HF 


SB POKE 7S5,6iDPOIfE 568, DL 



28 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page &amp;s New Atari User 



29 



XL/XE SOFTWARE 




m 




THE HIGHEST LEVEL 



This Issue brings to you a review of two 
gems for the trusty 8-blt. To be more 
accurate, this month's Software Clas- 
sics column is a review of six games, but in 
two boxes, each offering outs landing value for 
money. 
Many of you will be aware that my real 
Interest is adventures, but in order to keep 
this column well balanced T have not reviewed 
any adventures, until now. The two sets of 
adventures I have chosen to review this Issue 
arc Lancelol and Silicon Dreams. Before writ- 
ing the reviews I checked some old Issues of 
Page 6 in order to price the games and this Is 
what I turned up - Lancelot was released in 
1988 and cost £15, Silicon Dreams was ori- 
ginally sold as three separate adventures: 
Snowball. Return Id Eden and The Worm in 
Paradise at £]2 each. So. the total cost of 
buying these adventures was £5 1 1 You can 
now buy Lhc whole lot from New Atari User for 
a tenner. That has to be the bcsl sale of this 
New Year. 

I bought these adventures more or less as 
they were released, however 4 Silicon 
Dreams was subsequently ^^substantially 
improved with a a more^^ advanced 
parser, so J ZS J^ bought them 

again, and € jrt j^j/^lS^f ^ was we ^ 
worth it. W£^*ri&lt;*&amp;vL± i Both sets of 

adventures 
were writ- 
ten by Level 
9, who were 
one of the 
world's best 
adventure wri- 
ters. They were 
even put on a par 
with Infocom. in some American magazines. 




SILICON DREAMS 



Silicon Dreams is a trilogy of three entirely 
separate adventures set in the twenty third 
and tweniy fourth centuries. Part one takes 
place on board the colonisation ship Snow- 
ball. The vast amount of space to be crossed 
by the ship necessitates travel in hibernation. 
However, you are woken prematurely and 
realise that something must be wrong, dis- 
astrously wrong. 

Snowball is a huge game, and I do mean 
huge. The original version boasted some 7000 
separate rooms. At the time, playing Snowball 
on a 64k XE. I didn't believe that the adverts 
could be accurate. 1 don't ihfnk the editor 
believed this either, as he raised the point 
with the Austin brothers at Level 9 in an 
interview back in issue 34, Their reply was 
'they are all rooms in which you can leave 
objc tils' - nut that you would want to of 
course! The updated versions of the three 
games, including Snowball, boasts over 13 ^ 
million rooms. Heaven help you if you get lost! 

Second In the trilogy Is Return to Eden, * 
This Is one of my personal favourites, with f 
some really excellent puzzles to solve. Having 
just saved the Snowball, you are found guilty, 
unjustly, of trying to sabotage the ship. Your 
only option is to escape to the planet Eden, 
and evade the anger of your your shipmates. 
Once you have escaped to the planet, your 
adventure realty begins, Eden is home to a 
plethora of strange flora and fauna that pose 
great difficulties lo your very survival. Indeed, 
your only chance is lo find your way to the 
city of Enoch, Be prepared for the adventure 



of a lifetime. 

The concluding part of Silicon Dreams Is 
The Worm in Paradise. The adventure 
takes place some 100 years after the previous 
two adventures. You are a cll.br.en of the 
Enoch megapolls of Eden, a place that is 
almost perfect, but not quilt- No one in their 
right mind would want to challenge the sys- 
tem. Would you? Again, this Is a fantastic 
science fiction world created by the Austin 
brothers at Level 9. 

Trie Silicon Dreams trilogy are standard text 
adventures, but with graphics; there are some 
six hundred illustrations covering the three 
games. My only criticism of the set is the 
inclusion of graphics, which 1 feel add little to 
die atmosphere. The analogy I draw is that a 
great novel would not benefit from plctures. 
I lowever, this criticism is a little unfair as the 
graphics can be switched off if. like me, you 
prefer pictures generated in your own mind, 
prompted by rich prose. 



LANCELOT 



The second game reviewed this issue is Lan- 
celot, again by Level 9. Lancelot can only be 
described as a masterpiece, and a tribute to 
the detailed work of the Austin brothers. 

As you will have guessed, Lancelot is the 
story of King Arthur and the Knights of the 
Hound Table, It Is refreshing to see the story 
from a different perspective. I.e. that of Sir 
Lancelot, as Arthurian tales usually centre 
around King Arthur. Your live pounds buys 
you three adventures that will last a long time 
unless you arc a true expert. 

It will be immediately obvious bo anyone who 
is familiar with the Grail romances that an 
awful lot of research has gone In lo this game. 
You will find that the entire plot, people. 



places and events follow the romances close- 
ly, particularly Le Morte D'Arthur. The real 
magic in this game is the way that the puzzles 
and problems set in the adventure slot in with 
the story so seamlessly. When you play the 
game you actually feel embroiled in the plot, 
and the 14th Century story, told through 
generations, comes alive. 

The setting for the first part of Lancelot is in 
and around Camelot. where it Is your aim to 
become knighted and rise to the position of 
best knighl through valorous deeds In Ijogris. 
The game kicks off with trying to reach Came- 
lot, but to do so you must first pass the Black 
Knight,., The second part of the adventure 
takes place in Logris where your task is to 
free all the captive knights, arid enable Gala- 
had to return to Camelot. So. with all the leg 
work done, you finally move on to the con- 
cluding part of the adventure - the quest for 
the Holy Grail - the goal that many have 
dreamed of. 

Lancelot is truly captivating, and will keep 
you amused for months. The game is Level 9 
at its best and is not surpassed by any adven- 
ture in my opinion. One of this game's 
strengths, as with Silicon Dreams, is the user 
interface, Some of the useful features incor- 
porated include an UNDO feature, RAM 
saves, GO TO and RUN TO options which 
make the game that much friendlier to oper- 
ate. The XL/XE version is text only. 

I can only say that you really should try 
these classic adventure games, even (especial- 
ly) if you have never tried an adventure be- 
fore. At under £1.70 per adventure you get a 
real some real classics on disk, with excellent 
instructions and a novella in each box. Try it, 
give your brain some exercise, and be hooked! 

Usually games such as these are only avail- 
able on disk but unusually both Lancelot and 
Silicon Dreams are still available on both disk 
and cassette, so that every Atari owner can 
enjoy them. No excuses! 



reviewed by Mark Stinson 



30 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page G's New Atari User 



31 



XL/XE 

WDUTO 




AUTO FUNCTIONiKEYS 



Boot up Benjamin 
Arnold's program 
when you start a 
programming ses- 
sion and you will 
have many DOS and 
other functions 
available at the 
press of a key 



Auto Function Keys is a machine code 
program which sits inside your com- 
puter from startup and provides many 
facilities to go with normal BASIC. The main 
part of the code is over 2 KBytes long, yet due 
to advanced programming techniques only 
page 6 of available RAM is actually taken up 
by the program. However, once the routine is 
running under no circumstances must you 
use any program which uses the shadow RAM 
under BASIC, This includes programs such 
as RD BASIC in SpartaDOS or the Atari User 
Toolkit. 



THE FUNCTION KEYS 



The program gives you the following options 



CTRL+4 


Keyboard Click orVoft 




CTRL45 


Cursor on/oft 




CTRL+6 


Lett margin 0/2 




CTRU7 


Cal^ogye drive 1 




CTRL+8 


Binary toad 




CTRL+9 


Help 




CTRUO 


Go to DOS 




SHFT+CTRL+4 


Control Panel 




SHFT+CTRL+5 


Rename tile 




SHFT+CTRL+6 


Erase lile(s-) 




SHFT+CTRL+7 


Protect file(s) 




SHFT+CTRL+a 

rmwPA 


Unproteci file(s) 

TTRTT TTV 


t 



I have tested the program on SpartaDOS 3.2 
and Atari DOS 2.5, but it should work with all 
versions of SpartaDOS and Atari DOS, It may 
also work with others such as MYDOS. Jt will 
work on the Atari SOOXL. 65XE [both ver- 
sions) and i 30XE. Jt should also work on an 
expanded 600XL. However, it will not work on 
the old 400/800 due to the different memory 
map. 



SETTING UP 

Every tiling you need is contained in the 
program SETUP. BAS which is on this Issues s 
disk or available from New Atari User as a 
rype-ln listing. Either run the program from 
the Issue disk or type it In and save ft to a 
separate disk- Following this, format a fresh 
disk and write DOS to it. Then, load SETUP- 

BAS. insert the new disk and type RUN. 
Three files will be written Lei the disk - SHA- 
DOW.OBJ. (■-KEYS.COM and INIT.QBJ, Next, 
you must du different things depending on 
the DOS you are using. 

For Atari DOS, rename the file I NIT. OBJ to 
AUTORUN.SYS, reboot and then you are 
done. 

For SpartaDOS. the procedure is different. If 
you are using SpartaDOS 3 then you must 
create a STARTUP.BAT batch file containing 
the commands KEY OFF followed by 1N- 
IT.OIiJ. After this, the program is Teady for 
use. If not using SpartaDOS 3 you must re- 
name I NIT. OBJ L&gt; INIT.COM and create a 
STARTUP.BAT file which simple does IN1T. 

During loading the screen turns black, but 
once loaded, the program performs almost 
identically with cither DOS, The only major 
di (Terence is that when returning from DOS. 
in DOS 2.5 you must press reset to clear the 
system and to re-run Function Keys. In Spar- 
taDOS this isn't necessary. 



A WARNING 

Before I come on to describe each function, it 
Is important to say that if you are going to use 
page 6 for another program, please type 
POKE 9, 1 and press Reset before commenc- 
ing. If at any other time the system crashes, 
you may be able to restore it safely by holding 
down Option as you press Reset, typing POKE 
9. 1 and re-running Function Keys, 



EXPLAINING 
THE KEYS 

The first two keys (CTRLt4 and CTRL+5] 
are self explanatory. They work as soon as 
you press the key. and are toggles. The only 
quirk on CTRL+6 (Left marglnj is that once 
the left margin has been moved. It may move 
in either direction- Catalogue ■(CTRL+7) is 
easy - it simply does a full catalogue of the 
disk in drive 1. It will also give an expanded 
catalogue if SpartaDOS Is being used. 

CTRL+8 (Binary load) is very useful, as It 
fills a function which is missed out of BASIC • 
the facility to load machine code. After press- 
ing this, you are prompted Tor a filename e.g. 
Dl:TESTOBJ. The routine will find out the 
load address, but will not load if it is not a 
binary file. Once it in loaded, you can run it 
with USR. 

Hclp (CTRL+9) is simple - It gives a complete 
list of all the functions, and DOS (CTRL+0} is 
Just as easy. However, be careful as in DOS 
2.5 you could accidentally press this and lose 
your program. 

Leaving Control I^ncl aside for the time 
being, the remaining functions are easy. From 
SHFT+CTRL+5 to SHFT+ CTRL+8, they are 
rename, delete, protect and unprotect disk 



32 



Page B's New Atari User 



Page 6's New Atari User 



33 



Review 



flies. They can all use wildcards except re- 
name. They all ask for a filename, arid then 
do the job. Currently. SIJfT+CTRL+9 and 
are undefined I.e. they do nu thing. 



A CONTROL PANEL 



Control Panel (SHFT+CTRL+4)Js very use- 
ful. For example, some people don't like the 
normal colours of the Atari screen and Con- 
trol Panel will give you the chance to change 
them for good. You are presented with a 
menu, and must type in the number oryour 
choice. Each one is presented with the cur- 
rent value in HEX. You type in the identifier 
(down the left hand side of the screen) or to 
exit. However, to bring about the changes you 
must press Reset. To type In the new value. 
always type in two HEX digits. 

The two margin selectors only take effect in 
graphics and therefore, neither can be lar- 
ger than £27 (39} Also, be sure that the left 
margin is less than the right margin! 

The three colour options are self explana- 
tory, and can be anything from SOO to $FF 
(0-255). 

The last two are different fO sound can only 
be or 3 (type 00 or 03} and makes no 
di (Terence in SpartaDOS 1 or 2. If it is 3, you 
can hear disk, printer, cassette etc. sounds. If 
it is 0, these are barely audible. Cursor status 
is also useful. The usual values are ;as 
follows:- 



00 
01 

02 
03 

04 



06 



No cursor, inverse goes to normal 
No cursor, inverse vanishes 
Normal setting 
Cursor on but in- 
verse goes to blocks 
No cursor, inverse 
goes to normal and 
text upside down 
Cursor on, inverse 
usual and text up- 
side down. 



with 

a built-in 

Control Panel 



If you do anything silly, you can always 
press option whilst holding Reset and re-load, 

PERMANENT 
CHANGES 

The disadvantage with the above system is 
that you must reset the values each Lime you 
switch on, but there Is a way around this as 
well, Permamnent changes can be achieved 
by altering the SETUP. B AS program. 

On Line 2070. there are 6 values - 35, 2. 39. 
202. 148. 0. Ignoring the first, they are Left 
margin. Right margin. Pen colour, Paper col- 
our. Boarder colour. Just alter these to the 
values your require. 

The first number is special, and must be 
dealt with in binary. In binary 35 =0010 
00 1 1. The first four bits are the cursor status 
(00 10=2) and the second four bits are the IO 
sound (001 1=3) these ean also be changed 
and the number re-calculated. 

On cc you have made changes to the SETUP- 
,13 AS program, resave ft and run it again to 
make the changes permanent. 1 



THE LISTING 



AUTO FUNCTION KEYS is available ready to 
run on the Issue 70 disk and also as a TYPO 
coded type-in listing which can be obtained by 
subscribers free of charge. Check out the in- 
side back cover for details. 



ARENA 



Here's a rela- 
tively new 
game from 
Andy Guillaume. 
whose good work 
has previously fea- 
tured nn Page 6 
issue disks and in 
the PD library. A 
demo version of 
ARENA was included 
as a disk bonus with 
issued of NAU, but 
the full release must be acquired directly from 
Visionalre Software. 
You are employed as the Supervisor of a 
futuristic power plant. Unfortunately, due to 
the activities of certain rebellious forces, sev- 
eral volatile power pods have escaped from 
the main reactor housing. They are floating 
through the hazardous rooms of the plant 
and you have responsibility for guiding them 
back to the main reactor. The pods move in a 
predictable, but not particularly helpful, pat- 
tern ■ they keep travelling in a straight line, 
and turn left if there's something In the way. 
You can't control their movement directly but, 
using a Joystick, you can build and destroy 
walls in the open space to influence the sub- 
sequent course orevents. It's important you 
don't allow pods to collide with matter con- 
verters' since these tend to vaporise every - 
^^^^^^^^mmmm thing on 




• Tills: ARENA 
O PiMsher; Visionaire 

Sofisvare 
O Format- Disk 
O Price: £5,00 



34 



Page 6's New Atari User 



contact- 
Graphics are 
functional 
rather than 
spcetacular. 
The lower 



screen portion is 
occupied by a status 
panel informing you 
oT the ever decreas- 
ing bonus score enti- 
tlement (once It hits 
zero you've lost a 
life), the number of 
pods requiring cap- 
ture and the number 
that are currently 
l m' or 'out' of the 
destination reactor. 
Above this panel you"]] observe the walls. 
rooms and other scenery representing the 
power plant - this area scrolls vertically to 
reveal over two screens worth of play fie Id Tor 
each level. An orange outline cursor identifies 
the position where walls may be constructed 
or removed. Bonus tokens scattered through 
the levels can earn you extra points, time and 
lives. You initially have three lives but to 
avoid the frustration of Inevitable mishaps, a 
password system is invoked after every tenth 
level. A high score table is maintained on 
disk. 
Although at first Arena appears to be fast- 
paced, it's really more of a logical puzzle. It's 
wise to carefully consider each layout before 
you commence the process of building walls 
and manoeuvring pods. With fifty screens to 
master, this is a game that should keep you 
occupied for hours. 
Arena may be obtained from Vtsiortatre Soft- 
ware. Write to Andy Guillaume, 30A High 
Street Alcester, Wnm'iiekshire, B49 SAB to 
order or check the price. 



reviewed by Paul Rixon 



Pfljje 6's New Atari User 



35 




STATIONFALL 



Anyone who knows me, or who may 
have read any of my articles and re- 
views will have undoubtedly guessed 
my bias towards adventure and particularly 
my preference of the Infocom range. 

I make no apologies for my leaning towards 
Infocom which, sadly, no longer produce 
adventures for the Classic. If you are even 
remotely Interested In adventure and have 
never tried an Infocom then you must buy 
one now, while there are still some available- I 
have stocked up on all those available from 
the various suppliers, and still have 12 to 
play. Why not contact Derek Fern of Micro 
LHscount, or Page 6 and try one out? Jf you 
can obtain an Infocom you would be hard 
pressed to find a better adventure than Sla- 
tjonfall which is quite simply brilliant 

Stationfall is the sequel to the hugely suc- 
cessful Plane tfall (although you need noL have 
played this to play Stationfall). 

Along with the disk you will find the now 
famed selection of goodies contained in each 
Infocom. There is the ever helpful official 
technical manual, which is a must fur all 
players, especially the beginner. Along with 
tills there is a supply of forms which will be 
needed during the game, a full set of slation 
blueprints, and a badge sporting the caption 

reviewed by 
Mark Stinson 



Another Infocom Classic 



boldly going where angels fear to tread*. With 
badge sewn firmly on to your tunic, and 
administrative forms in hand, you commence 
your adventure ...... 



BOLDLY GOING 

Once you have the disk booted up you find 
yourself on the SPS Duify. a huge Federation 
Starship among whose crew you are but a 
lieutenant 1st Class (which is a step up from 
your rank as Ensign 7th Class in Planetlall}. 

Heading through your paper work you find a 
robot authorisation form, spaceship activa- 
tion form, and an assignment completion 
form. You will see that this latter form is an 
Instruction to fly to Space Station Gamma 
Delta Gamma 777-G 59/59 to collect '24 pal- 
lets of request for stellar patrol issue regula- 
tion black form binders request form forms' - 
thrilling stuff. If only life were thai simple. 

Before you depart on your mission you must 
visit the robot pool to appoint a companion on 
your mission, There are three robots to 
choose from, but however hard you try you 
always end up with the co-star on this epic 
mission. Floyd. Floyd is a boisterous little 
robot who was also your companion in Plane- 
tfall. He really is the central attraction In 
Stationfall, and hours of fun are to be had 
watching his comic behaviour. He is playlu!. 
moody, and at times unreliable on your mis- 
sion, which makes him all the more 'human'. 



36 



Page 6's New Atari User 



THE DEPARTURE 

The reunion over, you are now ready to com- 
mence your mission to the space station and 
to get there safely you must fly a spaceship 
presently docked on the east side of the SPS 
Duffy. The truck is mostly automated so that 
you need not worry about elementary space- 
ship physics- You will, however, be required 
to enter the time code on the truck's 
keyboard. If you make an error here you will 
certainly regret it! I remember the reverse 
thrusters bursting into life after a short trip 
and the truck coming to a halt in empty 
space. You have no fuel, and your only relief 
is by way of an emergency beacon, operated 
by pressing the appropriate button. Having 
pressed this button I listened, with a cold 
shudder, to a recorded voice as it tried to 
calm me; 'there is nothing to worry about, 
nothing an go wrong &lt;skip&gt; go wrong &lt;sklp&gt; 

I inwever, if you are successful in program- 
ming the spaceship accurately, you will short- 
ly be greeted with the incredible sight of a 
huge Space Station looming up before you. 
You can see that attached to this miracle of 
technology is a seedy looking space village 
which has grown in an uncontrolled manner 
over the years (obviously no Town Planners in 
this neck of the woods!). 

Before long the ship glides gracefully into a 
docking bay. Having collected your belong- 
ings, such as food and forms, you arc ready to 




begin the quest. You leave the ship with Floyd 
in tow, and enter the Space Station, 



THE SPACE STATION 

The Space Station Is pretty big, so there's 
plenty to explore. One of the first things Lhat 
strikes you as you roam the place is the 
distinct lack of human activity. This is parti- 
cularly strange when you study the bluep- 
rints and find that the ship's complement is 
usually 43. comprising 36 crew, 6 officers and 
a Station Commander, 

The station is split into three main areas; the 
Central Command Module, which is on 9 
levels: a Scientific Sub Module; and also the 
village. At various locations in the station you 
will find bits and pieces to aid you on your 
quest. For example, film spools are dotted 
about and these can be very useful sources of 
information when read on the machine in the 
library, The Commander's log also makes in- 
teresting listening, and gives you a further 
indication that something must be awry. 

It appears from a recent entry that the crew 
were tracking an alien ship as ft approached 
the Space Slation. The ship. It transpires, was 
brought into our of [he docking bays for ex- 
amination. The remains of a long dead alien 
hfeform, and a curious pyramid were found 
aboard the ship Extensive biological/scien- 
tific Investigations ensued [as a second prior- 
ity to the main raison d'etre of the Station - 



Page 6's New Atari User 



37 



printing!). 

Since the arrival of this ship 
and Its strange cargo ail of 
the electronic devices on 
board have been acting 
strangely. This is particularly 
concerning when you consid- 
er that all of the doors on the, 
ship are electronically oper- 
ated and soon start "snapping 
at your heels'. The Space Sta- 
tion is also maintained by 
welder robots who constantly 
check the integrity of the 
hull. When they start to mis- 
take you for a hole in need or 
repair don't hang about! 
Later, even Floyd seems to 
change. 

You will very quickly realise 
that your origtna] mission is 
no longer of primary import- 
ance, and that you have to 
now find the cause of these 
strange happenings. Should 
you fail, then life as we know 
it may never be the same 
again. 



IN SUMMARY 

Stat ion fa 1 1 is an excellent 
adventure which will keep 
you on your toes, and which 
poses some real good prob- 
lems to solve. Having said 
that, It is not so hard as to 
cause undue difficulty to the 
average adventurer, 
Stationfall is no longer easy 
to find but iTyou can locate a 
copy then I would strongly 
suggest you buy it imrncdi- 
iilclv- • 

38 



STATIONFALL 
THE FULL SOLUTION 

If you have not yet played Stationfall, then I would recommend 
that you skip this section as It will reveal all of the actions 
necessary lo complete the game If, however, you are stuck then 
you will lind your answer(s) here. 

E, N. INSERT ROBOT FORM \U SLOT, TYPE a. S. E, OPEN HATCH 
ENTER TRUCK, TAKE KIT, CLOSE HATCH, SIT, INSERT ACTIVATION 
FORM IN SLOT, TIME, ENTER CODE FROM SHEETS SUPPLIED WAIT 
UNTIL YOU ARRIVE AT THE STATION, STAND, OPEN HATCH LEAVE 
TRUCK. E, 0,0, OPEN CAN, GET FORM, NW. GET DRILL SE U U U 
U. WW, OPEN PRESSER, PLACE CRUMPLED fOHM IN PRESSER 
CLOSE PRESSER, START PRESSER, STOP PRESSER OPEN PRESS- 
ER, GET FORM, E, D, D. SE, SE, E. OPEN KIT. OPEN BOTTLE EAT 
SOUP, LOOK UNDER BED, GET STAMP, STAMP VILLAGE FORM 
DROP STAMP, W, NW, S, INSERT VILLAGE FORM IN SLOT, S S NE 
NE, SE, INSERT ID IN MACHINE, START MACHINE, TYPE 7, STOP 
MACHINE, GET CARD, (NEVER CARRY THE ID WHILE WEARING OR 
CARRYING THE BOOTS - THE MAGNETIC FIELD WILL RUlN IT), NW 
SW, SW, N, N, NW, 0, SE, INSEHT ID CARD IN READER N GET GUN 
S, W, U , SE, S, W, WAIT UNTIL FLOYD AHRIVES. FLOYD GET MEDIUM 
BIT, GET MEDIUM BIT, E, N, E, S, E, DRILL SAFE, REMOVE SMALL 
BIT, DROP SMALL BIT, INSERT MEDIUM BIT. DRILL SAFE DROP 
DRILL, W. NW. S. S, S, NE, NE, NW, EXAMINE CEILING, OPEN PANEL. 
GET STICK, SE, DOWN. SW, S, SHOOT BOX. GET COIN, N, SW GET 
CAN, NE, NW, N. N, N, SE. E, GET IN BED, WAIT. GET OFF BED GET 
GUN, CAN, KIT, STICK, W. NW, S, S. S, SE. SE, NW, NE U, N E 
BREAK MIRROR, GET FOIL, W, S, NW, OPEN CAGE, NE, SPRAY CAN 
W, SPRAY CAN. W. SPRAY CAN. W, NW, NE. INSERT COIN IN 
MACHINE, TYPE 6, PLACE STICK OVER HOLE, GET TIMER, SW SE 
SPRAY CAN, NW. SPRAY CAN. SW. SPRAY CAN. U, SPRAY CAN, U. 
SPRAY CAN, SW, OPEN PULPIT, PRESS SWITCH, SPRAY CAN HOLD 
LEASH, OPEN STAR, GET DIODE, D. DROP CAN, E. U, S, GET 
DETONATOR, OPEN IT. REMOVE BLACKENED DIODE, EAT GRAY 
GOO, DROP BLACKENED DIODE, NW, D, WAIT, WAIT. WAIT, FLOYD 
HELP ME [AFTER BEING SHOT), GET ALL, E, E, E, GET LAMP, W, S, 
SE, E. SPIN WHEEL, U, OPEN LOCKER. GET SUIT, WEAR IT, W W 
SE. D, GET BOOTS, WEAR BOOTS. W, NE, OPEN INNER, ENTER 
INNER, CLOSE INNER. OPEN OUTER, TURN ON LIGHT, OUT READ 
LABEL, PLACE CYLINDER IN BOTTLE. CLOSE BOTTLE. CLOSE KIT 
IN, TURN OFF LAMP. CLOSE OUTER, REMOVE SUIT AN D BOOTS. 
DROP THEM, OPEN INNER. IN, U. N , N. W, W. W, NW. SW, GET ALL, 
SE, SE, E, ATTACH TIMER TO DETONATOR, DROP THEM, OPEN KIT 
OPEN BOTTLE. GET CYLINDER, ATTACH IT TO DETONATOR, PLACE 
CYLINDER IN HOLE, LOOK, SET TIMER TO 2$. W. WAIT. E, GET KEY. 
W, NW. NE, NW, N, N. N, U, (LIGHTS GO OUT), TURN ON LAP, GET 
BOARD, D. S. S, W, GET JAMMER, ATTACH BOAHD TO JAMMER, E S 
SW, (PLEASE NOTE, VOUR INVENTORY MUST BE; FOIL, JAMMER 20 
PRONG FROMITZ, KEY. LAMP, GUN, KIT). DROP KIT. U, U, U. U, 
UNLOCK BIN WITH KEY, OPEN BIN, GET ALL. OPEN GHATlNG, 
ENTER AIR SHAFT. SET JAMMER TO 710, TURN IT ON. 0, D, D, D D, 
D, D, KICK GRATING, TURN OFF JAMMER, U, SHOOT FLOYD PUT 
FOIL OVER PYRAMID, 

Simple really! 



fa/xi www 
EVEN EASIER RUNNING! 



Page 6's Neu? Atari User 



by Andy McAtear 



1 haw Just read the article In Issue 
69 which Is called EASY RUNNING' 
and I have written a short Basic 
program which I have called MAKE- 
COM. which should make things 
even easier! 

Type in the short program pre- 
sented here and save it as MAKE- 
COIVTBAS. Then, providing that 
three simple steps are followed, the 
program will take away all the brain - 
work and give you Easy Running" 
programs automatically! 

1. LOAD the Basic loader then LIST 
it back to the same disk with the 
extender "LIS", [eg- " D:PODZ 
LIST 

2. Ensure that the object code file 
has the extender "OBJ" and that 
both files are on the same disk. 

3. RUN DiMAKECOM.BAS" from the 
disk and follow the prompts. 

You will be asked for the filename of 
the game you wish to convert, This 
must not have an extender, (e.g. 
POD?^, The program then searches 
through the "LIS" file for the relevant 
addresses. Ii then asks that you pre- 
pare a disk for the COM" file, You 
can use ihe same disk, although I 
use a disk with a menu file on it. Hit 
RETURN and the file is wrfllen Uj 
disk and that's It. 



XL l rem BttttnTmittr iiiiiiiiiiii mtttn i ir iiiiiiii mimrm 

MB 2 NEH « MAKECOM B 



by 

Andy HcAteir 



n 

» 
n 



NT 3 NEH » 

UK 4 HEM B 

KR 5 REM « 

FU 6 REM B NEH ATARI USER - FEB 1995 « 

in ? rlh mm t i i i i iHir i mm i r i ii i ii BBmro 

■H S HEM 

511 lO BZM I*«i2aJ,FBS(2B3,TS*3&gt;,NUMSC21:H 
EK=FRECai-SSH:»IH F S I HEM) ! F*=" ";F$IMF. 

OP 20 t ctiR*ii25):? it " Enter OBJ filena 

Me (HO EXTEHDER}";? : ? FMSJ 
QU 18 iMF'Ur tll6;I5:FW5(3)=I$:F1lSlLEN tFBSJ 

+ 11=".LI5' M 
Pll 4« 0PCM Ul , 4 . 8 ,FBS :IHPUT Bl,JS:FOR l-B 

TO 2 : NUM=-1 :ne*D TS 
BT IB GO5U0 seBilF NUH=-1 THEM INPUT Bl , I 

S-cnro ?e 

CF IBB HUMS tLI-NUHlWEHT L : aD(*L0 = NUMS (B) : A 

POHI-NUM5 CI) iINIT=HUKS(2) ICLOSE Bl 
JF 4.2B INITHX=INT&lt;XNXTV£50» ! IMITLO=XMIT-I 

■ITHI*Z56 
LC 1JB FN£(LEM&lt;FN$&gt;-£)="OBJ";OPE.M 81,4,0, 
f MS 

OD 1*8 A=ABR(FS) :AHI=XMT(A/256) :AEO=A-AMI 
*2iblfOKt B18.7:PO«E BSZ , BLO ; POKE 053, 
AHISPDKE 856,255 : POKE 857,255 

ID ISO X-llSBCADB&lt;"hhhaLVB"&gt; ,16) iP056 = PEEK 
(856) ;PftS7=PEE"C857) ; CLOSE ttl 

QH 155 FI«-P856+Pfi57*256* ADD! t ADDH IK2 5G 
1 : FIMHI=IHT (FEN/256) : FIHLO=FIH-FIHHI*Z 
56 

UZ 168 FM5fLEN(FBS)-2)= ,, C0M , ':? ! 7 "Prepar 
e Disk for ";FN$i? j? " and press EH33 

a ■■ 

EE 165 IF PEEK (53279) &lt;&gt;6 THEN 165 

BP 178 OPEN tH,U,«,IK;;l&gt;lII ttl,2SS:PUT HI, 

255:PUT Bl , ADDLO : PUT Ul.flDDHI :flll H1,F 

IMLO:PUT Dl.FIHHT 
HK 188 POKE B50,ll:POKE B5Z , ALO : POKE AS3, 

AMI r POKE B5d,PB56:POKF 4S? „ P*S7 : H=USB I 

ADD ("khhSLuS* 1 ) , 1 6) 
YL 1?0 PUT HI, 224: PUT Bl , 2 : PUT S1,225:PUT 
»1,2:PUT Hi,IHITLB:PUT MJL, IMITHI SOLOS 

E SI 
VJ 200 7 i? FM$i" is now on the disk in d 

rive &amp;l": END 
IC 584 TRAP 51*! FOB M=l TO LEHCI$)-3:EF I 

*«H,H+2)=T$ THEN HUH=UBL IIS (* + *) ) iPOP 

I RETURN 
SH 51B NEKT MiRETUflM 
UN 000 DATA 85Z,B5*,Ul&gt;lt 



Page 6's New Atari User 



39 



XL/XE 




Chris Thorley 
explains exactly how 
to connect your Atari 
Classic to your VCR 
so that you can video 
your favourite games 
while you play or en- 
hance your home 
movies 



You may be wondering why anyone 
should want to connect their Atari to a 

VCR in the first place. Well, I fur one regularly 



DIAGRAM 1 



TV 
AERIAL IN 



ATARI 



VCR 



SWITCH 
BOX 



RFOUT 
RFIN 



use mine for producing video titles for my 
home movies. You may also be stuck on a 
certain part of a game and by recording your 
game play you may be able to spot something 
happening on one part of the screen that 
could, be missed when you are concentrating 
hard on so me thing eJse. Of course, you can 
also use a video to provide irrefutable proof of 
that fabulous high score. With a goad VCR. 
and a lot of patience, you can also produce 
your own animated sequences. 

As you can see there are many uses that 
your Atari and VCR could be put to. Now, 
where to start? 



TUNE IN 

Firstly you need to tune a channel on your 
TV to your VCR, This may be done by using 
the test signal (two white vertical bars) pro- 
duced by the VCR Itself. Once you are satis- 
fied that you are fully tuned 
In you can now connect your 
Atari to your VCR. This is 
simply achieved by connect- 
ing the switch box at the 
back of your Atari to the RF 
or aerial In' socket at the 
back of your VC R (Diagram 
J). I should, of course, say 
Lhat your Atari, VCR and TV 
should be turned o IT when 
making these connections! 
You should now load a 
program into your Atari (use 



40 



Page G's New Alart User 



a cartridge if you have one]. 
Nest ensuring all oonnec- 
uons are made, your VCR is 
tuned to your TV and you 
have a program loaded, turn 
on your TV and VCR, If you 
areVerV lucky you should 
now see the loaded program 
on your TV screen. If not, 
don't panic This probably 
means that your Atari is not 
tuned in to your VCR, Select 
a channel on the VCR and 
carefully tune it until you get 
the picture from your Atari 
on the TV. Simple, isn't it? 



DOES IT 

LOOK 

OKAY? 



MONITOR SOCKET PIN-OUTS 



AUDIO 3 



N/C 5 




1 COMP. LUM 



4C0MP, VIDEO 



DIAGRAM 2 GROUND(SHIELD) 



DIAGRAM 3 



TV 
AERIAL IN 



ATARI 



VCR 



MONITOR 



Well, we've now got what we 
wanted. Or have we? One of 
the problems wilh this 
method of connection is that 
the output from the Atari's RF Modulator 
doesn't appear to be very stable, especially 
when connected through a VCR. You'll notice, 
after a short period of time, that the picture 
starts to drift off- tune. Evidence of this may 
be a bending of the picture in one of the top 
corners of the TV, or an increased level of 
background noise through the TVs speaker. 

Tlie reason for this drifting' is the method 
used to connect all these pieces of equipment 
together Your Atari sends to the RF modula- 
tor a composite video signal. This is in turn 
converted to an RF fTV-type) signal. This sig- 
rial is then received by the input circuitry of 
the VCR which converts this signal back 
down to composite video. This process is 
again repeated when the VCR sends a picture 



t 



AJV IN 



RF 
OUT 



to the TV. The original signal from the Atari is 
constantly being degraded by all this proces- 
sing and it comes as no surprise that another 
method of connection was thought of to over- 
come this problem. 



THE MONITOR 
CONNECTION 

The solution to this problem lies In the use 
of the Monitor socket, on the rear d the Atari. 
next, to the switch box socket. Pins 3 (audio 
out). 2 (ground) and 4 (composite vidcol re- 
quire connecting on a suitable 5-pin Din type 



Page 6 s New Atari User 



41 




®ean (Barraghty Software 

• PD Library * Commercial Software Publishing 
* Magazine Publishing * Hardware! So ftiv are bought &amp; sold 

NEW; THE QUICK SUPPORT DISK 2. AlKHhsf Supporl Dak lor Our QUICK programming languags Thswt 
eoniams tutwiaJt. lianas, and derronsiralcn program* art Player/Me &amp;il« graphics (including animation), Mandelbrot sms. togm in 
QUICK, direeiory maniKjIapon. primer dumps lor ire HP Oesfc-laswjet printer* primer dumps fw 2*-pm da main* printer* and an 
analyser lor QUICK programs. Th* disk is a mua lor all QUICK y&amp;en&gt; Pries: £4.95 inc. p&amp;p. 

&amp; FILE TRANSFER SERVICE ft W • can now iransler both lext and other ty pas oi files to and 
from Atari and IBM-PC. Filss can be translerrftd larrom the Atari on Single, " Medium" and Double Density 
formals. Files on the PC can be accepted onwrillen to 3W DD and HD, and 5W" DD Plaas* phona for 
details and a price quoit. 

Kodak branded SV*" DSDD blank disks. Teflon coated id resist finger prims and spills Excellent disks 
made by Verbatim. £2 70 (1 box), £5.00 (2 boms) including pip. Bargain! Cs.U for prices on 10+ boxes 
Lockabte 50 capacity 5%" disk storage box: £5.50 tnc/uaing p&amp;p. 

ST/AMtGA SWITCHABLe MOUSE. Shaped like a real mouse! Bargain at £9.99 inc pip 
Perisci for use with Quick, SAM etc. 

WANTED; Your univanted Atari hard ttjarvf software. We buy disks, tapes, carts, iwxyks.. 
mags, mag disks and any Atari related haniu-ctre. Phone ruiuifor an immediate offer! Stocks 
of used hardware/ software are always availalAe for sale. 

flKHE: fft ore now a/towed Co sell Power Per Post products to any country except Germans, Austria and Suitzerlond 

All prices quoted include UK pip. For a free copy of out 25 page catalogue of PD and 
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D.G.S, 62 THOMSON AVE, BALBY, DONCASTER, DN4 ONU, ENGLAND 
PHONE: (01302) 855026. Mobile: 0378-590259 



SIGHT AND SOUND 



continued 



plug [Diagram 2). These should be connected 
to plugs at the other end that will allow con- 
nection to your VCR, In my case they are 
phono type plugs, one for video and one for 
audio (Diagram 3). On connection, and selec- 
tion of the correct channel since you are now 
using a different input path, you should 
notice a much more stable picture and im- 
proved sound quality. As a comparison you 
can leave the switch box connected and 
switch between the different inputs. 



START RECORDING 

You should now be able tu make acceptable 
video recordings on your VCR. To get the 
most out of your Atari and VCR you will have 
to find suitable programs to run. One such 



program does exist that will allow you to die- 
ate visual masterpieces at a stroke (well 
almost). That program \s "Video Title Shop', 
and is one that I gave a favourable review to 
In NAU 62, You should also give your art 
packages a try, maybe even recording your 
artistic prowess on video to show to your 
non-Atari owning friends. 
Well, that's all for now. I would welcome any 
comments, critical or otherwise, regarding the 
article, even hints and tips on how to Improve 
on my own efforts. Also, if you have come 
across any programs that would seem ideal 
for an Audio/Video application I would love to 
hear from you. One last point, J won't accept 
re&amp;poiisibillly for any terminal meltdowns to 
computers and /or VCR s as a result of (his 
article. If In doubt, consult a qualified person 
before connecting any electronic equipment 
together. Good luck! • 



42 



geview 



GTRACKER 



Page 6's New Atari User 






Forget that boring office job, No need to 
win the lottery. You, ino, can be a 
mega -rich rock star and groove into 
the pop scene overnight wilh a little help from 
your faithful Atari 8-bll. Well, maybe it s not 
quite that easy but with GTRACKER posslblli 
ties abound! 

GTracker Is a sequencer, which means it's a 
program that can play digitised sound sam- 
ples In a user- specified sequence. The reason 
for doing this is that sound samples consume 
large chunks of memory (or disk space) and 
are therefore impractical to use for more than 
a few seconds. By sequencing a relatively 
small selection of digitised music 'clips' you 
can put together an impressively lengthy 
composition. All you need is some sample 
data and a set of sequence instructions. 
GTracker enables you to create the latter, 
whilst the samples must be supplied by you 
in Replay' compatible format, four example 
murines tire supplied. 

The GTracker File Editor is required to cre- 
ate a TRS' sequence file. This file is simply a 
list of commands that tell the sample player 
which memory addresses should be used, 
and for how long, in order to achieve the 
desired sounds. There are four types of In- 
struction, though only one of these is needed 
in execute the principal function - it consists 
of start and end memory addresses together 



• Tills: GTRACKER 

3 Publisher: Visionaire Software 

O Format; Disk 

O Price: £5.00 



You don't need an ST 
to enjoy sampled 
sound - your Atari 
Classic isn't as humble 
as you might think! 



with a speed parameter. An End instruction 
prompts the sample player to stop running. 
Restart asks ft to loop back to the beginning 
of a sequence, and Delay performs the 
obvious function. The GTracker TRS Flic Play- 
er - located on the flip side of the disk - 
translates your sequence and sample files, 
enabling you to demonstrate the success, or 
otherwise, of your efforts. 

That's all there is to ill It has to be said that 
you probably need to be Into' sound sampling 
already if you want to get the most out of 
GTracker, It's not a complex system and its 
not particularly user friendly, but you should 
be able to achieve some good resulls. 
Vlsionaire say they are hoping to release 
stereo and XE specific versions of GTracker 
soon, and updates will be offered to existing 
users. Public Domain disks containing sam- 
ple files are also promised. Meanwhile a PD 
version of GTracker is available from Page 6 
for those who want to see Its capabilities. 

GTracker may be obtained from Visionaire 
Software. Write to Andy GuiU.au.me. 30A High 
Street, Alcester, Waru&gt;ickshiie r li49 SAB to 
order or to check the price. 

reviewed by Paul Rixon 



Page 6's New Atari User 



43 



HARDWARE 




X-STATIC 



Many dedicated Atarians 
have the occasional desire 
to poke about in the innards 
of their computer or 
peripheral devices. Peter 
Kerrison dedicates this 
article to all those for whom 
things may have gone wrong 
once in a while 



One area of electronics which is now 
showing itself to be a major compo- 
nent killer' is static electricity. Static 
discharges arc all amund us all the time, but 
as they have to be in excess of 3.000 volts 
before you feel it [that's just a tingle) and over 
5,000 volts before you see It, most people 
don't understand the damage it can do. Static 
discharges cost companies hundreds of 
thousands of pounds a year, In fact when the 
problem was Investigated tl was- found to be 
on a much larger scale than anyone appreci- 
ated- Dy examining components under a 
scanning electron microscope static damage 
is easily recognised. It was discovered that 
components can be degraded by static, caus- 



ing pattern sensitivity (where certain bit pat- 
terns cause problems), decrease in perform- 
ance characteristics, premature failure or In- 
termittent problems. This is added to the 
problem of destroying the component com- 
pletely. 

As this degrading' ability of static is not fully 
appreciated, it is still not given the respect it 
deserves by the majority of people who handle 
components and printed circuit boards on a 
regular basis. Many companies are now 
embarking on educational programmes for 
their staff to teach them how lo handle static 
sensitive devices both new and faulty (we 
don"t want Initial problems compounded by 
static induced problems). 

The difficulty that arises in educating people 
to use anti-static measures is that they don't 
really believe in them. Oh, they will push an 
EPROM into conductive foam or wrap a cfr* 
cult board in aluminium foil, but only for 
trans porta lion. These sort of safeguards must 
be used every time the device is removed from 
it's circuit. 

As VLSI chips (Very Large Scale Integration) 
achieve greater circuit densities the insulating 
layers between Individual conductive paths 
become thinner and can therefore be dam- 
aged by relatively low voltages. Typical voltage 
levels necessary to damage a component are: 



MOSFET 


100-200 


CMOS 


250 2000 


TTL 


300 - 2500 



while typical voltages generated are: 

ACTION COMMON HIGH 



Walking across carpet 
Walking on vinyl floor 
Working at a bench 



12,000 39.000 

4,000 13,000 

500 2,500 



To bring the problem to a personal level, this 
could have happened to you already without 
knowing. Have a think - that last chip you 
changed - did you touch it 2 weeks, a month. 
6 weeks before? According to the latest re- 



44 



Page 6 m s New Atari User 



search y« u coU,d have daxna £ cd il ^ en - 
Although the generation of static electricity 
t be prevented It can be controlled in a 
limited area. If the item to be dealt with Is 
conductive then the problem is very easy. 
Charge on a conductive material will equalise 
itself over the whole surface area. Merely 
grounding the material will remove the 

charge. 

On no n -conducting materials this practice 
will not work as the charge can vary greatly 
from one point to another. This has to be 
dealt widi using an ionised air blower ■ a 
device which bathes the area with positive 
and negative Ions which are attracted to the 
charged areas of non-conductors and cancel 
them out 

We can now go on to describe the measures 
that can be taken against static. Both in order 
lo produce a totally static free 
area and also to guard 
against the more common 
static associa ied 
problems, 




v.: 



^Hf* 



WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT IT? 

In an ideal world 

Ideally all static sensitive devices should be 
handled in a static safe work area. This can 
be defined as an area where static electricity 
Is discharged at the same rate at which it 
charges. Therefore no static build up can 
occur, [n order to achieve this we have to 
drain all conductive materials to earth. This 
can be achieved by using a conductive work 
surface connected to ground via a 1 MegOhm 
^sistor (to limit current flow}. You should use 
a inductive mat and wear a wristband - both 
connected to earth via 1 MegOhm resistors. 



This will protect the components and circuit 
boards from any static charge on conductive 
materials used In the work area, 
Tills only takes care of the conductors. For 
the non-conductors an ionised air blower 
should be installed to completely bathe the 
work area. Any components or circuit boards 
carried away from die area should be placed 
in static shielding bags and sealed for com- 
plete protection. This would complete the sta- 
tic safe work area - at some cost it is true but 
for companies spending thousands of pounds 
on components and circuit boards it is a wise 
Investment, 

In the Real World 

What about us? We can't go installing Ion- 
ised air blowers h I hear you cryl! Well for the 
average Atarian who wants to stave off the 
anti-social lightning here's a few Ideas. 

1. Make yourself a conductive work surface 
that is connected to ground with a 1 
MegOhm resistor. Not too tough for a 
bright lad like you! 

2. Get a wrist -strap and use it! Something like 
a 3M Charge Guard 2066. It is comfortable 
to wear, easy to use and effective. 

3. Makeyourselfa clip to connect between the 
ground of the unit you are working on and 
the conductive work surface. A couple of 
crocodile clips will do. 

4. Only use a soldering Iron with a grounded 
tip. 

5. Those non-conductors? Keep them away 
no exceptions! J have a picture of the dam- 
age done to a chip by a polystyrene coffee 
cup. 

When you have seen the damage it can do, 
you realise that these simple precautions can 
siivc a lot of heartache, 

AU facts arid figures supplied by 3M UK pie 
courtesy of their Head Office at Bracknell En- 
glaixl probably the tvodd leaders In static 
conirol 



Page 6 s New Atari User 



45 




NOSAUG 

PD COMPILATIONS 

EDUCATION 



This Public Domain tape from NOSAUG 
contains ten games sharing a com- 
mon educational theme. They are 
mainly aimed at young players who have re 
centJy been introduced to the confusing world 
of numbers and alphabets. The programs use 
Basic so you can examine the listings and 
perhaps pickup some programming tips for 
no additional charge! 
First up. Spcllblut is a variation on the 
hangman theme. You arc asked to guess and 



then spell a word chosen from cine of three 
alternative categories - computers, animals, 
and musical instruments. The players objec- 
tive in Alpha Run is to manoeuvre a small 
vehicle over the numbers 1 to 9 or letters A to 
Z in sequence, whilst avoiding the screen 
boundary and other obstacles. Meanwhile 
Alphabet Train presents a fun way to learn 
spelling. A word Is displayed and the player 
selects corresponding letters from railway 
wagons which scroll horizontally into view. 
Correct letters arc deposited onto a truck and 
If there are no mistakes the word is whisked 
off screen to make room for the next one. 
The Counting Game asks, simply, how 
many symbols are shown? Success is re- 
worded by a cheery jingle and graphical sequ- ] 
ence. Marathon Mathi involves a race be- 
tween two players. The first one to highlight 
the solution to a multiple choice maths ques- 
tions gains several paces towards a finishing 
post. If the answer's wrong however, the 
opponent gains ground instead. In Math 
Attack you can select the type of questions 
(multiplication, division etc.) and also max- 



UTILITIES 2 



If you want to draw, compose music, print 
cassette inlays, calculate exchange rates, 
cheat at arcade games or design video 
titles, UTILITIES 2 fmm the NOSAUG PD 
cassette library is one for you! 
Artistic types wj]] enjoy Keystroke Artist, a 
drawing tool based upon straightforward 
keystroke commands. It may not be feature 
packed but it's not bad for a quick doodle. 
Antic Maga2inc"s Antic Music Processor is 
well regarded by disk users but has not pre- 
viously been released on cassette. Thanks to 
some hand work by NOSAUG. anyone can 
now sample the musical delights of this excel- 
lent machine code utility. It enables tunes to 



be composed, quickly and with minimal 
effort, by anyone who can read sheet music. 
The music player utilises all available voices 
over a range of five and a half octaves, and is 
accompanied by an attractive light bar dis- 
play. Four good tunes are also supplied on 
tape. 

With the help of Current Exchange you can 
discover how much your foreign currency is 
worth, but first you'll need to type in the 
up-to-date exchange rates. Why not use a 
calculator instead? On a more practical note, 
the 1020 Cassette Inlay Maker is - as its 
name suggests - for 1020 plotter users. Its 
function is to create blank inlays for placing 



imum values. The program generates prob- 
I jtis and waits while you enter the results. 
Copy c * 1 is an exceedfn S'y addictive (well I 
Wils hookedl) Simon Says' game. Using a 

vstick. yo« have to repeat the demonstrated 
sequence of coloured lights and correspond- 
ing sounds. The Reading Program is another 
memory jogger intended for slightly older 
users. A short story is displayed and then 
removed from view. You must answer ques- 
tions based on the story - not as easy as you 
think! Next. Fun With Worda comprises an 
anagram quiz and a simple hangman gamc. 
Last (and also least) Is Guess My Number, a 
spare filler that requires you to guess a 

numbed!). 
In the event that you don't find any of these 

programs useful, the good news is that they're 
supplied on a good quality C60 cassette t 

• Title: CI 2: EDUCATION 

Publisher. NOSAUQ 
G Format; Cassette 
O Price: £2.95 

Reviewed by Paul Rixon 



COJVTWBUTIOJVS 

YOUR contributions are the 
lifeblood of New Atari User 

All of your contributions are 

welcome but at the moment 

we need more 

GAMES LISTINGS 

BONUS PROGRAMS 

However don't stop sending in 

other articles and programs, if 

something interests you* you 

can be sure it will interest 

someone else so write it 

up and send it in - NOW! 



inside cassette boxes - handy if you need to 
re -use old tapes. 

If you're keen on arcade games but find them 
ti&gt;o hard. The Tapester (originally published 
by NAU) claims to have an answer - that is. if 
your game is one of l he fourteen recognised 
titles. All you do is choose the game that's 
giving you grief, run The Tapester and then 
load up the game itself In Hatty Builders you 
become Immune to bricks and dynamite, in 
Panther you gain infinite lives and in Hover 
^wer you can start at level sixteen! Finally. 
Video Tjtler allows pages of text to be input 
and saved in a sequence to record for your 
video fntros and credits. The t/e*t is faded out 



gradually to give your titles a professional 
appearance, Printed instructions provide 
hints on the technicalities of video connec- 
tions and editing techniques. 
Overall, Utilities 2 is a mixed bag but is 
worth having for the Antic Musk: Processor 
alone. Contact NOSAUG for details of other 
PD tapes available. 



• 


Tide: 


C09: UTILITIES 2 


o 


Publisher: 


NOSAUG 


o 


Format - 


Cassette 


O 


Price: 


£2,95 



46 



Page 3's New Atari User 



Reviewed by Paul Rixon 

Page 6's New Atari User 



47 



TIME 

by Ian Finlayson 

DAISY-DOT II 

GOING DEEPER 



In issue 69 f gave an introduction to the 
use of Daisy Dot II, and at the same time 
John Bunting described how to use 
Daisy Dot In a much more advanced way with 
Page 6 Writer and Spartados, [f you have 
hardware that will accommodate a RAM disk 
it is a good Idea to experiment with It ■ you 
will find you can gain significant speed In- 
creases with any program that accesses the 
disk drive rcgularry as disk access to the RAM 
disk Is almost Instantaneous, Anyhow 1 will 
continue at a more basic level expanding on 
my last article and showing how to change 
tlie Format oTyour document on the fly. 
We saw in issue 69 how to set the overall 
format oTthe document as you prepare to 
print 1L These various formats and fonts can 
be turned on and off inside your document if 
you want to highlight a word or sentence by 
boldening. Italicising or centring for example. 
There are 17 commands which can be embed- 
ded, and all an? done In a similar way. Go 
back to your favourite word processor - the 
commands have to be put into your text be- 
fore you go to DDK for printing. 



A SIMPLE EXAMPLE 

Lets take one specific example before looking 
at all the available commands. Wc will embol- 
den and underline the phrase 'within 7 days" 
in the sentence 'Tour reply Is required within 
7 days or further action may be taken!'" 



To start to Insert a command in your text all] 
you have to do is type a backslash V You 
not find this as easy as you expect! In Tex- 
tpro, for instance, [$HIFT)\ moves the cursor 
back one word! You have to type [E$C}[SHIF"n| 
to put the backslash into your document. If 
you are using another word processor that 
has a special Junction attached to the [SHIFTfi] 
combination look in the detailed instructions 
to find out how to generate a \ on its own. 

After the backslash you type the required 
command string. Don't worry about upper or 
lower case letters, both are treated the same 
by DDU. The command for bold is ii and for 
underline is U. Both these are "toggle" com- 
mands - that means you use the same com- 
mand to turn the feature on and to turn it off. 
So to get the format we want for our sentence 
it should look like this; 

"Your reply is required \U\Bwithin 7 day- 
sMJ\B or further action may be taken!" 



GENERAL USE 

Embedding other commands is done in the 
same way. though they are not all just a 
single character. You can see in the table the 
form of each command, The italic script in 
brackets shows what kind of input is accept- 
able. Do not type the brackets and do not 
leave any blank spaces that are not part of 
the original text as DDU considers spaces to 
be part of the text, not part of the embedded 
commands. 

A word of caution about the embedded for- 
matting commands is necessary. Although 
DDII ignores these your word processor does 
not, so If you put long commands into a text 
line your word processor will treat them as 
text and insert a carriage return to start a 
new line. When DDII removes the formatting 
command the line can become ttxi short and 
it will look rather peculiar. If you want to 
avoid tills problem try as far as possible to 
add format paragraph by paragraph, 'l"he 
commands can then be put in on the blank 



DAISYDOT 2 - Embedded Commands 



48 



Action 


Form 


Notes 


Font change 


\F {D.FUename.Extj 


Dx:Filename.Ext is name of font (ite 
(must be available to DDll at print 
time). DDII assumes .NLQ If Ext Is 
omitted 


Density change 


\D{1-4} 


1 - Single, 2 - Double, 

3 - Double Draft, 4 - Quadruple 


Spacing change 


\S{0-9orA-Kj 


From - no space to 9 approx. 1 .5 
characters spacing 


Left Align 


\L 




Centring 


\C 




Right Align 


\R 




Justify 


\J 


Makes both left and right margins 
straight. Do not justify last line of a 
paragraph {add ML at end of para- 
graph) 


Right Margin 


\M{0-9orA} 


1 - 0.5", 2 - 1", 3 1.5" etc. ■ none, 
A - 5" (on 8.5" paper) 


Bold 


\B 


toggle 


Double Wide 


\W 


toggle 


Underline 


\U 


toggle 


Append 


\A {Dx: Filename. Ex tj 


Insert on its own line - Chains text 
of Dx: Filename. Ext at end of 
document 


Position Tab 


\P 


Sets a Tab at current column 
position 


Execute Tab 


\T 


Adds spaces to next tab stop 


Erase Tabs 


\E 


Erases all Tab Settings 


Include file 
Verbatim 


\V{Dx .Filename. Ext} 


includes file Dx:Filename.Ext byte 
by byte in the document (e.g. to 
embed picture file) 


New Page 


\N 


Forces start of new page 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page 6's Neiv Atari User 



49 



]fne between paragraphs. This Is particularly 
Important for the long commands - those that 
Include a filename. Where it is essential to 
format small bits of text within a paragraph 
try not to use too many commands at once. 
For example \D\U\D1 to turn on Bold. 
Underlined, Single density text followed by 
\BW\D2 to revert to norma] effectively adds 
two seven letter "words" to the line In your 
word processor. 
Daisy Dot II does not have aVYShVYG (what 
you see Is what you get] capability so inevit- 
ably there has to be a btt of trial and error. 
Keep some old paper handy for your first 
print out and check that the layout is entirely 
satisfactory before printing final copy. At first 
it may seem a bit tedious but you will soon 
gain experience and the Improved final 
appearance of your document is well worth 
the effort 



DETAILED NOTES 

I do not expect you to want many \ charac- 
ters in your documents (unless you are going 
to write an article about DDltll) but if you do 
It can be achieved by preceding each \ with 
another \. So \\ prints as \ and WW prints 
as W, 

Most of the embedded format commands are 
easy to use If you follow what is in the table, 
but one or two are probably not fully self 
explanatory so here are a few amplifying 
notes, 

ALIGNMENT - The individual commands are 
probably self explanatory, but ft may not be 
so obvious that you can use more than one 
alignment command In the same line. Let's 
take an example. If you are writing a long 
document you may like to have a top line on 
each page which has the Chapter number on 
the left the document name In the re n Ire and 
the page number on the right This can be 
done as follows; 

\LChapterl\CMy Autobiography\RPagc 1 
30 



Start the next line with the alignment com- 
mand that is In use in the main body of the 
document (VJ or \L usually), If your word 
processor has the ability for headers and foo- 
ters you can put a line like this into the 
header to be automatically printed on every 
page 

TABS - Aligning text correctly in columns can ' 
be difficult if you try to do il with spaces, but 
DDII makes it easy. First turn off existing 
labs with \E. Then as you type in the head- 
ings for your columns you can set up the 
tabs, for example: 

SURNAME VPFORENAMK \PADDRKSS 

Now as you type in the text for the columns 
just put in the VTs to align to the tabs: 

Finlayson\TIan\T6Q Koundstone Crescent 

Easy isn't it? Just one further point - If you 
want to centre or right justify the whole block 
of columns it is essential that each line is the 
same length - otherwise everything will turn 
out ragged again. To achieve this Just put an 
extra \P at the end of the first (heading) line 
at the point where you want the line to end 
and a. \T at the end of all the other lines. 

GRAPHICS - Embedding a graphic Is possible 
using \V, but tills is something I have not yet 
tried. There is a Basic program on side B of 
the DDll disk called Billboard. This allows 
you to change the size of Mlcropainter files to 
suit your document. As I understand it the 
graphics capability only allows full width 
graphics - DDII can not wrap text around a 
graphic. If you have used graphics in DDII 
why not writs a short article or a letter to New 
Atari User and share your experience. 

That's all for this time, I will go on to the 
DDII font editor and other extras in the next 
time. Meanwhile if you have any specific tips 
or questions about DDII please write to me, 
Ion Fin layson, at 60 Roundstone Crescent, 
East Preston, West Siisse* BN1 8 1DQ and I 
will try to include you in the next article, 



The Accessory Shop 

ISSUE 70 



CONTINUING CLASSICS 

A 1 though there is no new softuxire nowadays there is still a chance 

to buy the classicsjrom yesteryear. Stocks are dwindling though and 

this could be the last chance to complete your collection . Buy now! 



ASTEROIDS 

Asteroids surround youl Use 
your photon cannon to defend 
your spacecraft from a field of 
asteroids which become progres- 
sively smaller, SWiNer and more 
dangerous, Watch out tor enemy 
sauo&amp;fs loo! For 1 id 4 playsrs 

ROM CARTRIDGE 

OUR PRICE £5.00 



LIMITED STOCKS 



MILLIPEDE 

Creepy crawly bugs tike jumping spid- 
ers, bulling tiees. bouncing beellas, 
mnjqjit&amp;SS dragon^hes inch wens 

and earwigs haw invaded your hWe 
garden paich and you ha*» to bias! 
lasi lo cm rul gf tham! Fast action 
graphics and greaii sound Use your 
Trak-Ball for even greater (Xay power 

ROM CARTRIDGE 

OUR PRICE £5.00 



LIMITED STOCKS 



POLE 
POSITION 

THE facing game tor the Atari 
Classic. Very I kills has inv 
proved on ihis winning formula 
™ai brings untold fun to young 
a nd old alike. 

ROM CARTRIDGE 

.OUR PRICE £5.00 



DEFENDER 

An aJMiirie cla&amp;aic 1rom the arcade* 
Ahem have swarmed over your plana) 
attempiirig to capture hiimartotds and 
transform them into destructive 
mutants Fortunately you command 
Defender, the most deadly spacetftp 

war Keep an syo on the radar For 1*ia 
nesct allack wave 1 Or 2 piaysrS 

ROM CARTRDIGE 

OUR PRICE £5.00 



LrrW7E0 STOCKS 



KAB00M 

The Mad Bomber is bact and 
intent on blasting you ta kingdom 
cone unless you can gei your 
buckets of water out in time to 
catch and diffuse the bombs. 
One of the simplest concepts yet 
highly entertaining, especially tor 
the kids. 

ROM CARTRDIGE 

OUR PRICE £3.95 



LIMITED STOCKS 



TENNIS 

Forehands and backhands, driving 
approach shots angled volleys, avsi- 
head smashes and tricky lobe - you've 
aen all the strokes in Tennis! Hnres 
fie action pacHod game thai chal- 
lenges you to play at your owl Play 
singles against the computer or 
another player or doubles against 
another player 

ROM CARTRIDGE 

OUR PRICE £5.00 



LIMITED STOCKS 



GALAXIAN 

Swarms ol Drones Emis&amp;anes and 
Hornets lead the way in attack anti 
proled the Com menders wtio guide 
the force Your only hope is to blast 
them oin ol the Sky before they 
destroy you True classic e*cne- 
menl that can still give you sweaty 
palms. 10 skill levels 

ROM CARTRIDGE 

OUR PRICE £5.00 



LIMITED STOCKS 



MUSIC PAINTER 

An exeimg edueai lonai proo/am inai 
helps to leach music by using colours 
instead ol ncrtas Change the fitleen 
supplied bpngs to laatura difte'an in- 
struments, make (he notes longer or 
thenar or transcribe your own songs 
NO musical knowledge required In 
make your own great music. 

DISK ONLY 

OUR PRICE £4.95 



LIMtTED STOCKS 



10-PRINT 

Owners of the IDS printer JUSt have 

io have this superb ubliy that enables 
program Jislings, to tn printed out with 
all ihe oortlrol ctiaraclerv (jus,l as you 
see in New Atari User) as well as 
printing in any choice of font. Full in- 
structions are included for you to print 
Out your letters and Other documents 
in any font you choose 

DISK ONLY 

OUR PRICE £4.95 



PAGE $ EXCLUSIVE 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page G's New Atari User 



91 






ROM CARTRIDGES 



All brand new in original boxes, mostly shrink wrapped 



ONE ON ONE 

Play basketball win two of America's lap players .r this 
greal spots simulation which fealures realistic olle-nsiva 
and defensive moves:, fatigue factors, hoi streams a Shot 
ex*, even nstsrl replay and a shattering backboard i 
LiKe the game of basketball itself, One-on-0ne rewards 
you for playing with your head as well as your hands 
Waster the joystick moves, sharpen your Timing and 
hone yewr reflexes Jump' Shoot I Score I 

OUR PRICE £6.00 
US FOOTBALL 

American Football ts a big craze in this country and you 
can row play at home Outsmart the defence, pass with 
amazing accuracy, run with speed add agility. make 
tackles, select offensive arid defensive plays and more. 
You can lake cm the computer in a practice game Of 
challenge a friend lo a dramatic video bowl game of 
your own in a packed stadium All the 1 hnlls of ' he 
gridiron 

OUR PRICE £6.00 
SUPER BREAKOUT 

Breakout was trie ordinal simple yet totally/addictive 
game and the enhanced version will provide even more 
addictive tun Needs paddles 

OUR PRICE £3.95 



There are very feiv 
ROM cartridges left 

now for the Atari - 
complete your collec' 

tion while you can 



FIGHT NIGHT 

Fight Nig hi brings you all ire thnlts of the boxing r.ng as 
you lacs live of l he most brutal lighters ever tis five 
separate battles are tola! war wnh relentless action The 
Boxing Constructor Set allows you and your opponent lo 
create your own perlecl boxers, selecting slamina, intel- 
lect and style. Tram, spar and slep into the nng to pit 
your perfect boxer against Ihe computer or another 
opponent. 

OUR PRICE £6.00 
POLE POSITION 

Everyone has heard ol Pole Position, the racing game 
that inspired almost every racing game since. It may be 

the original anc some other games may have added 
features tui p c e Position snJl retains ris challenge after 
many years. One of those games lhat has exactly the 
right balance of game ptay and graphics lo make it a 
jdassic that will last lorever If it is not in your collection, 
make amends now i 

OUR PRICE £5.00 
HARDBALL 

An the thnlts ol American baseball can be yours on a 
summer afternoon in trie ballpark Sit behind home 
plate, along the left field line, down the right field line or 
join the manager in Ifie dugoul. Look over the pitcher's 
shoulder as he ihrows the next bail You control all the 
adion of ihe batsmen, pitchers, and fielders as you try 
and battle your way to the top or the league An exerting 
game lor one or two players 

OUR PRICE £6.00 
BASIC CARTRIDGE 

Some programs, especially some early public domain 

programs wont run on ihe XL0(E but thiay will it you 
plug in the old version of Basic 

OUR PRICE £2.95 



DISKS 



SILICON DREAMS 

Taking the role of Kim Kimrjerley you are a leading 
participant in the colonisation of Eden, a planet 
prepared for human habitation by an advance guard 
of intelligent robots who battle, with the native arid 
highly aggressive fauna. In this highly structured 
and realistic environment you must move your mind 
into the twenty-third century- Sri icon Dreams is three 
excellent graphics adventures - SNOWBALL, RE- 
TURN TO EDEN and THE WOHM IN PARADISE 
from tne masters, Level 9 

OUR PRICE £5,00 



ZORKI 

The Infotom classic and the adventure game that 
changed the way all future adventures were written. 
The Great Underground Emp«re of Zork is well docu- 
mented by now and thousands of players have 
become addicts graduating id Infccom's more diffi- 
cult adventures. Zork I is the ideal introductory level 
adventure for beginners or those w?th a little experi- 
ence. II you have never ventu'ed underground be- 
fore now is the time to try, it's never been cheaper 
to expand your universe! Classic original Infoccim 
packaging with excellent manual and a map. 

OUR PRICE £2.95 



DISKS . . . DISKS 



PANZER GRENADIERS 

in itis e*cmng solttaire wargame you make the deci- 
sions for a regiment of the eine armoured mlantry 
uiiacried id the Panzer Grenadiers Your forces also 
include mortar, artillery, Panzer IV, Paniher and Tiger 
unils The Russian enemy is directed by the computer 
which will tensely challenge you with ns own comple- 
ment ol mtentry, tanks and anli-tank guns. Three levels 
ol difficulty, joystick control, ni-res graphics. 

OUR PRICE £5.00 
LANCELOT 

Level 9 recreate ihe time of wizards and the Knights ol 
;ne Pound Table m a three pan adventure spanning the 
complete saga of the quest for the Holy Grail. Superbly 
, researched and superbly written this (efl adventure is 
lull of atmosphere and hgfiiy recommended 

OUR PRICE £5.00 
RAMPAGE 

It's rough and tumble all the way as yOu control three 
incredibly nasty characters which bear a remarkable 
resemblance 10 King Kong. Godzilla and Wolf-man 
through an orgy d( destruction in Chicago. New York 
and San Francisco You ha^ *50 days of destruction in 
50 different cities Time for some revenge! 

OUR PRICE £3.95 
THE E FACTOR 

Tne £ laclar represents the amoum of time the energy 
sources on the planets in our gataxy will last Many 
planets need emergency tuei capsules delivered 11 they 
are to survive You must plot the interplanetary course 
and guide your craft through the quadrants filled with 
obstacles such as space nines, alien fighters and Spin- 
ning asteroids Can you complete a mission belore 
another planei calls on you r services' 

OUR PRICE £3.00 
DRUID 

Another classic in which, as Last ol (He Great Druids, 
yen wander through she Dungeons of Acamantor with 
your mighty Golem by your side on a quesi to destroy 
the tour demon princes As you delve deeper into the 
dungeons you will find chests containing spells ol for- 
midable power to aid you and Pentagrams of Life which 
will heal and revitalise you. Excellent graphics and su- 
pers gamaplay make this one dI Ihe best arcade games 

OUR PRICE £3.95 

GAUNTLET THE DEEPER DUNGEONS 

[f you haue the original Gauntlet disk then you will 
Know how good the game is and will want to emend 
P«r/ with ihe Deeper Oungeons. Over 500 new 
°jngeons are here for you to explore This is tne way 
io revive you r interest in Gauntlet and play on tor many 
"we hours or days! This is a data dsk only and 
'^"■rasthe original Gauntlet disk 

OUR PRICE £2.95 



52 



Page 6's New Atari User 




NEW YORK CITY 

Welcome to The Big Apple The hurried jungle of steel, 
concrete and glass ensiles wrth fascmaung sights and 
more than ris share of danger Prom the placid greewy 
of Central Park, there is no city in trie world like New 
York, and boy are you about to lind I hart out I As a 
visiting tourist you only have a limited time lo see all the 
sights, but New York Crty has a little mote excHement, a 
little more danger in store than a mere sightseeing trip to 
Hie zooi 

OUR PRICE £3.95 
BALLBLAZER 

The year is 309/ and you are the contestant in the most 
competitive and by far the most popular sport &lt;n the 
uniwrse. Jump immediately into head-to-head action 
against a Inenfl or hone your skills against a selection ol 
Drotds Either way, you're in for the match of ihe cen- 
tury' Excellent graphics and spin screen action haw 
made this one ol the Atari classics. 

OUR PRICE £3.95 
JUNO FIRST 

A fast and furious space shoot 'em up translated from 
Konarru s early arcade machine of ihe same name 
Dozens of alien craft wilt allack Irom all sides and you 
must be quick to blast them away and earn your 
bonuses If you feel thai yov are gang to die then you 
can take the last resort and warp away through a 
kaleidoscope of colour Similar to invaders. this fast 
shoot 'em up will appeal to any arcade game fanatic 

OUR PRICE £3.95 
JUGGLES RAINBOW 

A first computer experience &lt;er children aged 3 to 6 
trial teaches the concepts of above, below, left and 
nghi plus letter recognition allowing children to en|by 
learning with colours and music and games they can 
create and play themselves 

OUR PRICE £2.95 
THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS 

Control James Bond through eight fast and fundus 
levels from Gibraltar to Afghanistan and you will encoun- 
ter the SAS (friendly), the KGB [not so friendly) and 
enemy helicopters (very unfriendly!). Vou a/e up aqa rz: 
Brad Whittaker international arms dealer and megalo- 
maniac. Necros his ruthless sidekick and Kostikov, Ihe 
double dealing KGB General. You may fall in love with 
the beautiful Czech cellist Kara, but can you trust her? 

OUR PRICE £2.95 
NIBBLER 

Slinking through an unknown land Nibdler finds himself 
m an indesceni world ol consiant change. As time grows 
short he body grows longer and he risks running into 
himself Can he survsus^ 

OUR PRICE £1,00 



Page 6's New Atari User 



53 



CASSETTES at just 95p each.' 



180 

A ore* dans challenge EigH oppo- 
nent, digriised speech, two player op- 
tion irve |Oysiidt control, f ui matclhplay 
scoring, a sense of humour, supe*fcn 
payability 



K1KSTART 

The ultimate off- road motorbike scram- 
ble simulator Guide your ruder carefully 
over the oosladss in this all action 
Simulator for 1 player against the com- 
puler or 2 players aaaunsi each other as 
weil S the dock 



BOMB FUSION KNOCKOUT BOXING 

i i«r™iai oano has olanted bombs UNU^tVMUl BVAIIW 



A terrorist gang has panted bombs 
th roughout the Sellerseale Nuclear Pro- 
cessing Plant and you ha™ to go in 
and save the plant and possfcly the 
Nu-rs r &gt;Hfl-iEpierHVon desrucior 

DESPATCH RIDER - 

Join The growing band ol sireet demons 
who termy the population of me big 
crtiBs to gat lhe parcels through Plan 
your move* to make some money, but 
dent late loo Song ■ time is always 
short Gam an instant macho rating and 
be a despatch rider with this simulation 

FEUD 

To wirv at Feud you must 'out -spell" 
your rival Wizard Leanorc. In Kioto's 
herb garden yom will imd the ingredient* 
lot your spells but tread carefully as 
strange things can happen in |h* game 
ol magic ano mystery 

FOOTBALL MANAGER 

Pasture* include Transfer Marked, full 

League tables, mauriet. save game 
f acidly promotion and reieganon; FA 
Cup match**, managerial rating: * dwi- 
scne; as many seasons, and you like; 
pick your learn usng seven skill levels 

OHOSTBUSTERS 

Ha* anybody seen a ghos,r&gt; M atter of 
raci yes mey have' At me ve*y momecn 
hundreds of ohosK are making iheit 
way to i he infamous spook centra) 
Only you can save me world Irom a 
d.saster of bHieal proportions. 

GUN LAW 

Four rnonths of bloody alien attacks 
have taken iheit loll - all the surviving 
mhabnanls have fled and arson attacks 
have been made on your weapon 
stores You are left- io fight alone 
againsi ruthless and ypodthirsly Iullert 
with |ust a smgle machine gun 

HENRY'S HOUSE 

Little Henry has shrunk He mufil navi- 
aie his way through the royal house- 
old to li nd 1 tie cure Avoiding all the 
obstacles, m his pain, from tumble 
toothbrushes. Sh rough pestiierous par- 
rots and chels ehas*tg ch^kens, to a 
final encounter with 1he vicious vampirei 



I! 



Challenge lor the Heavyweight Cham- 
pionship ol the World Oy boxing your 
way past nine progressively mora s*ilful 
opponents You Wil need Speed and 

skwio delrver stomach punches, pr&gt;nls 
scoring head jat* or deadly upper cuts 
Your musl keep your guard up or th* 
referee will counl you Out 



LOS ANGELES SWAT prH -, JE 

fiwua ihn hnttatMK from the terrorist H V^^J v *- 



PLASTRON 

Take your place m a smal band of 
prates out lo steal fossil fuels from lhe 
bggest oorpw alien m. me galaxy You 
nusi guide your shuttle craft along the 
surface of the ptanst Plastron to collect 
as much luel as ydu «.n ''cm me 
heavily defended mine zones and then 
rendezvous with lhe supply lank 

PROTECTOR 

Assigned 10 Fort Ftucker.the US Army 
Helicopter Training School your aim is 
io become the best chopper pilot Ibis 
tide of me Iron cuttapi Your rrwsion 
mrs sis ol a stralegc bailie af wns 
between yourself and either another 
pilol or a computer controlled RPV 



Rescue lhe hostages from lhe terrorist 
gangs holding oirt in Wesl L A Clean 
jp trie streets Blow away (he bad guy* 
and be a hero on network T Vf FaiT and 
you won! pe coming baj* 10 watch ft. 
All acion joystick bending compel lor 
those with the skill io survive! 

MILK RACE 

Cycling 1 .&lt;xa tmles ts no mean leal - 
and you could end up feehng pretty 
exhausted by lhe nme you've Itnened 
playing this superb race simulation de- 
signed with the Milk Race irttnind 

MR D.O 

An Old lavrjurile in Whktl Mr Did has 10 
Cu for htdoen food supplies in in* 

'r&amp;ann' lernlory Defer* ground A* h* 

digs he pan eat cherries or crush the 
Wearies with apples Special Treats 
earn extra points and a Magic Power 
Orb tar Kll all the Mean«s 

NINJA 

Blasts the ben pfl all other mariial ant 
games! Thai s all n says on the inlay! 
Sditiboi&gt;b sure reckons thrs is lhe best 
punching, kicking, ducking and diving 
game around 

ON CUE 

A challenging; real Me srmulalion which 
combines Pool and Snooker on the 
same cassette An absolute must for 
boih enihusissts and oegirmers alike. H 
you have ever warned to be at the 
Cructole now s your chanos 

PANTHER 

Save lhe last humans on Xenon before 
lhe alien hordes lurn them info Sunday 
roast 1 Take you&gt; ground anack ship 
mrough this M&gt; scrolling mega thoot 
em-up with great graphics and unoe- 
lievable sOundltacK 



INVASION 

Mobilize your units and prepare for bat- 
tle This al acicn space oonfld re- 
qunes skih, strategy and taaes. You 
must desUoy the weamer conirol stalon 
m pider to win (he battle bul every 
move you maKo the enemy will counter 
and they're waning for you io sip up 



PENGON 

Can you save Penguin Wifly from the 
ferocious mutant sea lions' Stun them 
by knocking Ihem agamsl the walls or 
crush them lo a horrifying de^h w«h 
siding ice Mocks High speed arcade 
action game, great grapnics and music 



You are the ROGUE. Your mesion ii lo 
search the Dungeons of Doom tar 1he 
Amulet of Yendor In lhe dungeons you 
wi\ find many Wings id ad tne quest Icr 
lhe Amulet You will also encounler 
fearsome monsters and fiendish traps 
mat wi n challenge am your s kills 

REVENGE II 

The Mutated 90 toot high, laser spitting 
death camate have rebelled agamsl 
their caplors the Zzyaxians arte! ateoul 
tor revenge' Al anion, highly graphical 
shoot-erh-up Irom Jeff Mmler 

ROCKFORD 

The only lrue arcade version of the 
classic game Boulderdash There are 
four levels on each of live dilt erSM 
worlds whh four screens on each level. 
It al i ad* up to eighty lotaly dftlereni 
playing screens 

SIDEWINDER II 

It * 27 years since the (rial battle of the 
war with the aliens 27 years of peace 
have reigned «i the Western Spiral Arm 
of lhe Galaxy. All this is about to 
change Step aboard your craH and pre- 
pare to defend mankind in this all action 
space blast 

SPEED HAWK 

A smoothly scrolling arcade game in 
which you must drfend the ring world* 
of your solar system 1rom space pi- 
rales You alone can piksl the single 
seater lighter to undertake lhe iask of 
destroy rng tfie mulani guardian that 
protects the fleet of pi rale ships 

SPEED ZONE 

Emer the Speedzone in a frame de- 
fence against marauding alien lorcos A 
survey ship sen! into 1he area comes 
under anack. As an enemy vessel 
draws closer your "STAR FIRE* class 
attack craH is launched 

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CASSETTES 



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Ta&gt;urw ine role of Kim Kimberley 
«oo are a leading participfifll m the 
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advance guafd of inieliigenf ratxHs 
who banle with the nanwe and highly 
aggress 'vw fauna In TtirS Miflhly 
slrucluted and realistic envtremment 
you must move your mind intolhe 
iweniy-thud c*ntury. Silicon Dreams 
is ih'« escstient graphics, adven- 
mrss - SNOWBALL, RETURN TO 
EDEN and THE WORM IN PAHA- 
OlSE iroiTi the masters, level 9 

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DECISION IN THE 
DESERT 

Take command al the Battle of El 
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creators of F*1 5 Strike Eagle 

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LANCELOT 

Level 9 recreate ihelime ol wizards 
and the Knights of the Ftounrj Table 
m a three pan adventure spanning 
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recommended 

OUR PRICE £5.00 

BATTALION 
COMMANDER 

An exoimg real-time lacficai game 
with you as lieutenant colonel m 
Change of an eniire armourea bafla- 
lion. Choose from live different sce- 
narios !rom a irammg mission 
against a Soviet lank baltalion lo 
jour^h assign mems agamst lhe 
Chinese You can adjust the retail ve 
51'engihs cf your lorcss and the 
opposition and choose ftom 40 difte- 
rwjl maps and 5 different scenaiios 

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STAR RAIDERS 

Battle against ne the Zyion emrjire in 
your siar shp m wnat b probably the 

most famous ccirrpuler g^rne ever This 
'uH version ol |he classic game is imjw 
■iva labie on cassette complete wih tul 
tfistrud ions Can you afford 10 be with ■ 
oul lhe program that people bought an 
Atari for' 



TAIL OF BETA LYRA! 

Our A-Z of Atari Software series says 
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TWILIGHT WORLD 

Erter ihe Twilight World. Equfjped with 
Shelaiesi m anti-g ravrty pods and Laser 
weaponry, battle your way mrough each 
of me eleven dungeons defeating men 
liendrshty devious inhabitants along the 
way A game from Atari [herns-elves i 

UNIVERSAL HERO 

Only seven seconds left to save me 
planeji Universal Hero has to save his 

skin and everybody else's by finding 

Bis lo repair a shutile lo get id a planet 
to pick up the spares to mend a space 
freighter whKti * Out of control arid 
aiwut tQ blow him and his chances of 
getting back lo earih to atoms 



CROSSFIRE 



You ate alone in a deserted diy sur- 
rounded by aliens who shocrl lasers 
from every direction You II havH tc 
concentrate on where the shots are 
coming from otherwise you II be caught 
m the CROSSFIRE One ol those hairly 
Simple yel highly addictive garnet 

OUR PRICE £2.95 



COLOSSUS CHESS 4 

Claims to be the oesa cnees prog- 
ram ot ail The write?? ofSargon m 
would disagree, but there ts no 
dcutM this is a fine chess simulation 
particularly tor advanced players 

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54 



Page 6's New Atari User 



ORDER ITEMS FROM THE ACCESSORY SHOP WITH THE ORDER FORM 

ENCLOSED WITH THIS ISSUE OR WRITE TO 

PAGE 6, P.O. BOX 54, STAFFORD, ST16 1DR 

TELEPHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED ON 01785 213928 USING ACCESS OR VISA 



Page G's New Atari User 



55 



» k. 




aLn&amp; i iigkzM 




with John S Davison 

MIDI 

FUTUREPROOFING 



MIDI has now been with us for a long 
time, around eleven years In Tact, 
and It's a tribute to its designers 
that It's managed to keep up with users' re- 
quirements during this time, They knew it 
was unrealistic to try to think of every possi- 
ble function to Include in the original specifi- 
cation,, as unforeseeable requirements were 
bound to arise once MIDI got out into the real 
world and people began using it in anger. A 
degree of "futu reproofing"' was required to 
allow additions to be made later, and they 
delivered this through the "System Exclusive*' 
class of MIDI messages, 

Actually, futurcprooflng wasn't originally the 
prime role of System Exclusive, but it's tur- 
ned out to be a convenient vehicle for deliver- 
ing extensions subsequently made to the 
basic MIDI specification. Its original intended 
use was to provide an open-ended means of 
supporting manufacturer specific hardware 
features found on particular makes of synth- 
esisers, drum machines, and other MIDI de- 
vices. These included the uploading and 
downloading of single voices or banks of 
voices between a storage device and synth- 
esiser, and remote editing of voice parameters 
to produce new patches. However, there arc 
now two subclasses of System Exclusive - 
those uses! for manufacturer specific opera- 
tions, and the so-called "Universal'' operations 
through which major MIDI extensions have 
been implemented. 
Different manufacturers use their own prop- 



rietary methods of handling things !ikc dur 
ing voice patches and voice patch editing, to 
fit in with their own internal hardware desig 
MIDI doesn't specify or restrict the hardware 
design or architecture of the devices using it, 
so this doesn't transgress any MIDI stan- 
dards. It does mean that manufacturers can 
take advantage of any new developments in 
sound generation technology in new models, 
so this too in its way can be thought of as 
futu rep roofing from the hardware aspecL A 
brand new synthesiser model using a com- 
pletely unique, innovative method of generat- 
ing Its sounds will still work with the basic 
MIDI functions ■ but specific support soft 
then has to be written using System Exclu- 
sive to achieve the type of voice patch library 
and editing functions mentioned above. Lets 
take a quick look at how this works, using a 
voice dump message for an E-mu Proteus 
synthesiser as an example. 



SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE 

System Exclusive messages form part of the 
MIDI message stream like any other message, 
so the first require merit is that they should 
identify themselves. This is achieved by a spe- 
cial System Exclusive status byte having the 
hexadecimal value EQ, which effectively warns 
I he system that what follows may be specific 
to a particular manufacturer's device, follow- 
ing this the message needs to indicate the 
manufacturer and model of device involved in 
the operation A specific hexadecimal code 
value has been allocated to each registered 
manufacturer, br example 41 for Roland. 43 
for Yamaha, and 1R for E-mu. Device model is 
also coded, and the Proteus may be identified 
by the value 04. for example, There may be 
more than one Proteus synthesiser in your 
system, and this is handled by allocating a 
single byte serial number to each one. Then 
by including the appropriate serial number in 
the message the operation can be aimed at 



foe required device, and will be ignored by all 
ther devices In the system. Together, these 
Items represent tbe System Exclusive 

■header". 

Beyond this header the content may vary 
depending on the requirements of the opera- 
tion. In our example the next byte would be a 
code indicating that the data following repre- 
sents Proteus preset voice data, and after this 
would be sets of data fields carrying the pre- 
set voice number and parameter values defin- 
ing it as required by the Proteus sound gener- 
ation architecture. Finally, a marker is 
needed to indicate that the end of System 
Exclusive data has been reached, achieved via 
a status byte with the value hexadecimal F7, 

There s one more thing usually included in 
System Exclusive messages carrying lots of 
data - and that's a simple form of error detec- 
tion. MIDI cables aren't the most reliable 
means of transferring data from one device to 
another, so some means of detecting trans- 
mission errors is needed, This is usually 
achieved via a simple checksum technique, 
for example summing the value of all data 
bytes, dividing the result by 12S. and using 
the remainder as the checksum value. The 
sending device appends this value to the end 
of the data and the receiving device recalcu- 
lates the checksum from the data it receives 
and compares it with the appended value. If 
the two agree, then the data transfer is 
deemed to be correct and the receiving device 
sends a positive acknowledgment (ACKJ mes 
sage to the sender. If not, an error has occur- 
red and the receiver sends a negative acknow- 
ledgment (NAK) to the sender and transmis- 
sion then has to be repeated until an equal 
checksum comparison is obtained. 



UNIVERSAL OPERATIONS 

The other subclass of Systems Exclusive 
™=3sages cover Universal operations, and 
these are further subdivided into three types, 
known as No n -Commercial, Non-Realtime. 



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and Real lime. The first named is used typical- 
ly in educational applications so won't be dis- 
cussed further here, but we'll see examples of 
the other two shortly. In fact, I've already 
mentioned two Universal Nan- Realtime mes- 
sages - the ACK and NAK messages cited 
above. They apply to data transfers between 
any two devices, no matter who manufac- 
tured them, and hence are "universal" in 
scope, 

When samplers arrived on the music making 
scene a few years back they brought a new 
problem with them. Trie raw material for 
sound generation wasn't just a bunch of pa- 



56 



Page 6's New Ataii User 



Page 6's New Atari User 



57 





m 



]Mltrj+x 



m^~ 



li 



Tin 



rametera required by a particular synthesis- 
er's architecture, but also included 'digital 
recordings" of the sounds themselves. And 
guess what? Different manufacturers use dif- 
ferent formats to internally store all this sam- 
ple data, so transferring (ak.a, dumping) 
sounds from Sampler X Into Sampler Y [of a 
different make) doesn't usually work. It's pos- 
sible to record Sampler X's sounds onto audio 
tape and then resample them into Sampler Y, 
but there's an unacceptable loss in sound 
quality using this method. The answer is to 
use a "Sample Dump Standard'' (SDS) to 
allow direct transfer of samples In a common 
format from one device to another via MIDI, 
and this has been added to MIDI as a Univer- 
sal No n- Realtime System Exclusive based 
function, 

A typical dialogue between two MIDI devices 
Involved in an SDS transfer begins with an 
SDS dump request from the dump receiver to 

the dump sender. The dump sender responds 



sampler users needing this type of function. 



MIDI TIME CODE 

As mentioned in the last issue professional 
music, film, and video studios tend to use 
SMPTE timecode (or synchronising together 
various pieces of audio, film, and video re- 
cording equipment. When MIDI gained wide 
acceptance these studios needed to integrate 
it into their existing working methods so it tooj 
needed to embrace SMTTE timecode. but 
MIDI wasn't designed with this In mind. The 
original solution was to build special syne hi 
nfsing equipment which read externally gen- 
erated SMPTE code and converted it in-flight 
to MIDI clock and Song Position Pointer mes- 
sages, This was expensive, and also tedious 
use as SMPTE knows nothing about tempos, 
so tempo maps of each MIDI song also had to | 



with a dump header containing the basic phy- be built and Input to the synchroniser for 



sical details about the dump, such as number 
of bits in each sample, sample rate, sample 
length, loop points, and similar - enough to 
enable the receiver to reconstitute the sample 
in its own internal format. Tills is followed by 
a series of "data packets", each carrying 120 
bytes of sample data plus appended check- 
sum for error checking. The usual ACK/NAK 
interchange takes place G&gt;1 lowing the trans- 
mission of each packet as required to achieve 
a successful sample transfer from one device 
to the other. 

All of these are Universal Non-Realtime Sys- 
tem Exclusive messages, as the data is In a 
standard format by the time it's transmitted, 
But there's a slight snag. How does the data 
get into that format? The answer is that each 
manufacturer has to include appropriate code 
to support SDS wilhin the operating system 
of the device, Because of the compromises 
made in Its fmplemeniation not all manufac- 
turers have given their support to SDS, which 
means it isn't the panacea everyone was hop- 
ing for. But, it does work between devices that 
support It, and has proved very useful lo 



setting and changing the songs tempos at the] 
appropriate points. Smooth tempo changes 
for acoelerandos or rallentandos were not 
easy to achieve. Also. MIDI had no means of 
directly handling the hours, minutes, 
seconds, and frames time stamp format that 
SMFrE uses, which made life very difficult for 
those wanting to synchronise MIDI sound- 
tracks with SMPTE encoded film or video 
sequences. The answer was another MIDI ex- 
tension known as MIDI Time Code (MTC) - 
again achieved via System Exclusive. 
Actually, MTC isn't Itself a timecode, It's 
really Just a mechanism by which SMPTE 
timecode can be carried inside a MIDI system.! 
And once there, any software time stamping of j 
MIDI events (e.g. as in a sequencer) can be 
made to work in terms of the same units and 
hence permit synchronisation with external 
SMPTE devices. MTC has been added to MIDI 
as a Universal Realtime System Exclusive 
based function - plus a special message in tb«| 
System Common class. These allow timing/ 
positioning information in SMPTE format to 
be sent round a MIDI system Just like MIDI 



clock and SPP messages, allowing the re- 
quired integration of MIDI and existing pro- 
fessional audio-visual operations. 
An SMPTE interface is still required between 
a computer system and external SMPTE 
equipment, but this tends to be less expen- 
sive and easier to use than the old pre -MTC 
synchronising kit. It also usually incorporates 
the facility for striping a tape track with 
SMPTE timecode. so this hardware provides a 
user with a self-contained SMPTE facility 
when used with an MTC equipped sequencer 
package and multi-track tape recorder, The 
major ST MIDI software manufacturers such 
as E- Magic (for Creator/ Notator) and Stein- 
berg {for Cubase) produce SMPTE Interfaces 
to complement their sequencers. 



MTC SETUP 

Another flavour of MTC is used for linking 
specific MIDI events to given SMITE frame 
positions. This is similar in some ways to the 
"sound tracker" programs available for the ST, 
in that you compile a "cue list" defining events 
you want to happen at specific times. The 
soundtracker program is normally used to fire 
off musical samples or sound effects to per- 
form a piece of music, but its MTC cousin has 
a much wider, scope, Not only can it trigger a 
sampler, but it can also perform such tasks 
as remotely controlling the operation of a 
multl- track tape recorder or CD player via 
MIDI messages, Of course, these devices need 
a suitable control Interface to enable this to 
happen, but many items of studio equipment 
now have these fitted as standard or as an 
option. 

Communication between the devices invol- 
ved is handled by the MTC Setup facility, 
implemented via Universal Non-Realtime Sys- 

em Exclusive messages. Event timing is 
available io an accuracy of one hundredth of 

t|JD] me qnd daUl S * nt Qan mcmde strin * H of 
daiLa f or whatever purpose you require. 

wh ole area is probably overkill for 



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amateur use, but is very important in the 
professional world. Also, it does mean that 
the amateur can start out using a subset of 
the techniques the professionals use then ex- 
pand into the higher realms of MIDI as his 
talents, aspirations, and requirements grow. 
And that's no bad thing for the budding 
recording stars of tomorrow. ' 



58 



Page 6's New Atari User 



Page 6's Neiv Atari User 



39 



ST PUBLIC DOMAIN 



HOUNDUP 



COIN-OP 
CLASSICS 



If you want to play clas- 
sic coin-op games on your 
ST then check out the 
many titles available as 
public domain or share- 
ware. The Page 6 ST Lib- 
rary features many im- 
pressive coin-op dories. In 
this issue's PD Roundup I 
wilt examine some of the 
best titles available. So 
let's boot up your ST and 
travel back to the early 
1 980s when games oozed 
playabUity and lOp's 
were Wp's! 



by 
Stuart 
Murray 



60 



Defender is the original 
shoot-em-up! In 11 
you had to protect 
humanoids by destroying 
wave upon wave uf alien 
crafts with your spaceship 
'Defender', 

For Defender freaks there is 
OFFENDER (1MB) ■ an 
almost exact clone of the 
arcade coin-op. The vector 
landscape, scanner, laser 
beams, smart bombs, huma- 
noids, landers, pods, etc, are 
all there, along with digitized 
sound effects. The gameplay 
is a touch sluggish but cer- 
tainly fast enough to keep 
you blasting. 

CYBERNETLK is, a fast, 
smooth and glossy version of 
Defender, The gameplay suf- 
fers slightly in thai it doesn't 
feature the element of de- 
fending humanoids. The ob- 
jective is simply to blast or 
die! However, there is the 
advantage of multiple power- 
ups, 

Cybcrnetix boasts digitized 
sound and speech, colourful 
graphics (the spinning 3D 
asteroids are particularly im- 
pressive), lots of different 
aliens and killer gameplay! 
Impressive, frenetic and chal- 

Page G's New Atari User 



lengfng, this one will stay In 
your drive for ages! 



ASTEROIDS 

Asteroids holds great affec- 
tion for me. I must have 
spent a fortune In ten pence 
pieces playing the original 
cotn-up. The concept like all 
great games, was simple. 
Destroy tht~ hireling asteroids j 
with your ship before they 
crash in In you. The coin-op 
featured simple vector 
graphics with little more 
a few "bleeps" and "bangs"' for 
sound effects. However, ft 
was addictive in the extrcmel 
ASTEROIDS is written 
by those protectors of the 
classic coin-op. Sinister De- 
velopments. This clone 
brought the memories flood- 
ing back. It is based heavily 
on the original The jaggy, 
vector graphics and sparse 
sound effects create the "feer 
of an old arcade machine. 
The gameplay is fun and 
addictive, although perhaps a| 
little too fast early on, Even 
the enemy spaceships look 
like the originalsE 



pACMAN 

No need to describe this old 
friend I Pacman took the 
world by storm back in 1982 
and is still a great game 

PACMAN ST was fea- 
tured the last time PD 
Roundup reviewed games 
(Oct/Nov 19931- It is the 
closest version to the eoln-op 
and is an essential addition 
to your software collection! 




For something a little diffe- 
rent check out HACMAN U 
(1MB). This is an amazing 
Pacman clone with 100 
levels, digitized sound and 
surprises by the barrow load! 
There are six ghosts plus 
cameo appearances by other 
creatures. The levels are 
creatively designed with each 
having a personality of its 
own, e.g. the level entitled 
Doctor Who' features Daleks 
and "ExteiTOJnatel" samples. 
Other highlights Include puz- 
zle boards, secret warps and 
a rather novel Kill to Eaten' 
ratio for each ghost. The 
tt^Play is smooth and re- 
■ponatv*. The constant 
Ranges keep the game fresh, 

H ™an Hi* Pacman with 
Personality. 



MRS MUNCHIE {1MB] Is 
a very good clone of Ms Pac- 
man, It has all the original 
playability plus many extra 
features, including digitized 
sound effects, 20 different 
maze styles. 200 levels and a 
Top 1 hlghseore chart. 
There are many game charac- 
ters. As well as Mrs Munchle 
there are six ghosts, The 
Munchle ma tor, Happy Bee. 
Lightning Bolt. Maw: Bug 
plus lots of pick-ups (includ- 
ing the very useful Zap! 

smart bomb). Joystick re- 
sponse is a little slow but 
not so as to affect the 
addictive gameplay. For 
young children there is a 
handy Kids Mode featur- 
ing slower gameplay. 
dumber ghosts and fewer 
bad guys to worry about. 
Mrs Munchle is yet 
another example of a classic 
coin -op title which is still as 
enjoyable today as it has al- 
ways been! 



SPACE 
INVADERS 

As the main Instigator of the 
coin -op revolution. Space In- 
vaders is probably the best 
known coin-op of them all. It 
is well represented on the ST- 
Two of the latest versions are 
Space Invaders and ST Re- 
view Invaders 

Budgie UK's SPACE IN- 
VADERS is the closest to 
the original. It features two 
modes of play. Classic Mode 
Page 6's New Atari User 



is presented as the original 
coin-op and Modem Mode fe- 
atures sharper graphics. 1 
Hkcd the Classic Mode a lot - 
it plays just like the coin-op 
{except the missiles travel 
faster) and features almost 
identical presentation, in- 
cluding the Invader designs, 
spaceships, bases, etc. It's 
like being back within the 
raws of Space Invader 
machines again I 
ST REVIEW INVAD- 
ERS is a colourful version. 
Animated aliens and a wavy 
ground level create a "boun- 
ty" feel to the game. There 
are also some digitized sound 
effects. Very playable. 



GALAXIAN 

Sinister Developments have 
also produced GALAXIAN 
a clone of the original coin -op 
in which you had to fight off 
waves of Invaders which 
swooped at you in formation, 
Galaxian was always a tough 
game to play - much more so 
than Space Invaders, You 
had to carefully manoeuvre 
your ship to avoid the swoop- 
ing aliens. Also, you could 
only fire one missile at a 
lime. This made pinpoint 
accuracy a necessity. 

Sinister'* version is as tough 
as ever. It has all the ele- 
ments of the coin -op (even 
the original title design is dis- 
played at the main menu). Be 
sure to remove the bottom 
border oTlhe screen (use the 
Options menu] as this gives 

61 



contact ... contact ... contact 



you the Ml play area. 
For another version of Gala- 
Kian check out INSEC- 
TROID. This is a manic ver- 
sion t The style Is different: 
you must shoot waves or 
swarming insects. There are 
many different types «T insect 
(both big and small!) and 
sampled sound l flee Is are 
used to good effect. Furious* 
action! 



ROBOTRON 

Robotron was a fast- action 
arcade game in which you 
had to defend the human 
race against the Robotron 
armies. This involved racing 
about the screen rescuing 
humans and blasting the 
waves of Grunts, Hulks. Elec- 
trodes, Progs and Spheroids, 
The gameplay was a killed 

In 199 1. Je IT Minter decided 
to create the definitive ver- 
sion of Robotron. The result 
was LLAMATRON. which 
he described as, ""90s ultra- 
violence in its very essence!". 
Llama tron is packed with 
sampled sound effects. There 
are screams, explosions and 
animal sounds galore! The 
gameplay is pure JeJT Minter! 
You control a "totally hard 
laser-spitting llama". The hu- 
mans have been replaced 
with sheep, llamas, camels 
and goats! The enemies are 
now Coca Cola cans, house - 
plants, hamburgers, etc. 
Even some original Space In- 
vaders make an appearance! 
Add tn (bis lots of power- ups 

62 



and you have a real cracker 
of a game! 
The ultimate objective of 
Llamatron is in destroy the 
O/rlc Tentacle of level 99 and 
get to Herd Heaven on level 
100. Along the way you'll ex- 
perience software program- 
ming at its best. Llamatron is 
Robotron gone crazy) 



CENTIPEDE 

Sinister Developments have 
also authored a version of 
that 'king of the trackball' 
coin-op. Centipede. Back in 
1982, die 1 Op's were flowing 
and the trackballs smoking 
whenever Centipede was in 
the arcade. Centipede was 
basically Space Invaders in 



the garden. Instead of kilting] 
aliens, you had to kill cen- 
tipedes, scorpions, spiders, 
etc. II was faster than most 
shoot -em -ups of Lhe time ar 
very addictive to play! 
Sinister s CENTIPEDE 
( 1 MB} is a very professional 
piece of programming. It cap. 
tures the whole feel of the 
arcade coin-op. The actiun is] 
smooth and the presentation! 
polished. Great stuff! 



AND THERE'S 
MORE... 

Check the Page 6 ST Llbr 
for details of more classic 
coin -ops. You can never han 
too much of a good thing! 



ROUNDUP RATINGS: 

OFFENDER (1MB)(ST662) 
CYBERNETLX (ST885) 
ASTEROIDS (from ST745) 
PACMAN ST (ST51 5} 
HACMAN U (1 MB) (ST540) 
MRS MUNCHIE (1 MB) (from ST804) 
SPACE INVADERS (from Budgie 24) 
ST REVIEW INVADERS (from ST888) 
GALAXIAN (from ST888) 
INSECTROID (ST860) 
LLAMATRON (ST500) 
CENTIPEDE (from ST888) 

All disks are available from the PAGE 6 ST Library 
- check the latest catalogue or updates or phone 

0785 2 13B2 8 for further information 
Page 6's New Atari User 



FOR SALE 



BOQXL SYSTEM: 800X1,1050 

Dish Drive, loads and loads of 
games, cartridges, magazines 
and books All good working 
order £75- Tel 0506 433760 

9-BIT SOFTWARE: A collec 
tion of around 240 disks, cas- 
settes and ROMs (all genuine 
originals). Please write for ex- 
tensive list to Paul, 17, Spring 
Road, Clifton, Sheftord, Bed- 
fordshire SG 17 5RE 

MICROPflOSE ST GAMES: F 
19 Stealth Fighter and Formula 

One Grand Prix, both originals 
in "as new' condition. Best offer 
will be accepted. Write to Paul, 
17, Spring Road, Clifton. Shef- 

ford. Bedfordshire SG17 5RE 



WANTED 



ADVENTURES: For the ST or 
XL/XE, any of the following - 
Spellbreaker, Beyond Zork. 
Plundered Hearts, Wis hb ringer, 
Moonmist. Leather Goddesses, 
Mid Forever Voyage, Plan etf all 
or Suspended. I can offer 
some great ST and XUXE ti- 
des in return. M. Stinson, 7 
Arleston Lane, Wellington, Tel- 
ford TF1 2LT. Tel. 0952 
641360 



WANTED 



MAGAZINES: Is there somaone in 
the UK who is willing vs help ma to 
complete my collection o( PAGE 6 
magazines? I only need issues i to 
9 inclusive. Good price- and postage 
paid. Could also swap tor other 
magazines (ANTIC, Atari User or 
other issues of PAGE 6}, hardware 
(e.g. The Alien Vaita Box), or ori- 
ginal software (cm ROM. disK or 
cassette). Please just let me know 
what you wish and make an offer 
Id: John van der Spoel. Groanes- 
tein 1, 3334 CG Zwijndrschi. The 
Netherlands 



FREE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The CONTACT column 19 free of charge to subscribers who 
wish to sell their equipment or contact other readers. Space 
is limited so we request that entries be kept as short as 
possible. Extremely long entries may be heavily edited or 
Ignored. Send your CONTACT notice on a separate sheet of 
paper tnot as part of a letter) to: 

CONTACT, PAGE 6 PUBLISHING, STAFFORD, ST 16 LDR 



FOR SALE ... WANTED ... PEN PALS ... ADVICE ... HELP 



PROGRAM LISTINGS 

As most program listings would take up several pages of NEW ATARI 
USER we no longer publish those listings within the magazine. The 
programs are available ready to run on the Issue Disk which is 
available for each issue, details of which are found on the DISK BONUS 
page, if you prefer to type the programs in yourself, every listing, 
complete with TYPQ codes, is available to subscribers free of charge. 
Either drop us a line or telephone and ask for the listings you require 
quoUng the Issue number and the title. 

W ci C to ^STDVGS, NEW ATARI USER, P.O. BOX 54, 

STAFFORD, STIG 1DR or telephone 0785 213928 



Page 6's New Atari. User 



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